PUblic REnaissance: Urban Cultures of Public Space between Early Modern Europe and the Present (PURE)


Project Summary

The central concept of the project is that of a “Public Renaissance”, by which we intend to examine both the urban cultures of public space in the early modern era, and to set this into dynamic dialogue with the recently invigorated discourse around the agency of public space in shaping contemporary events.

By proposing a cross-chronological enquiry that sets the relatively remote formative period of many European cities into dialogue with the contemporary world, we explore and reveal how the past is inscribed in the material culture of the public spaces we still inhabit, and how these contribute to shaping actions and events in the present. Our project considers the early modern period (c. 1450–1700) in the urbanised heart of Europe, with particular attention to case examples between the Netherlands (Deventer, Leiden, Amsterdam), Germany (Hamburg), Spain (Valencia, Madrid), Italy (Trento, Venice, Bologna, Florence) and England (Exeter and Bristol).

Working with an interdisciplinary team of architectural, social and cultural historians, in collaboration with non-academic partners from the museum/heritage sector, and shaping our research agendas in dialogue with contemporary planners, architects and policy-makers, we will probe the continuities and ruptures that shape urban spaces of the past in relation to contemporary urban interaction. In addition to primary archival research methods, we will work with locative media technologists to create smartphone apps that enable an engagement with histories of place, to propose an innovative place-based research methodology. While historical enquiry is at the heart of the project, through digital tools and interaction with regional city museums, we will communicate the memories and meanings of public space in European cities.

Prof Fabrizio Nevola

Project Leader

University of Exeter
United Kingdom


Valencia's Market Square, by Charles de Lalaisse (19th century)

Civitas Exoniæ (vulgo Excester) Urbs Primaria in Comitatu Devoniæ, Braun & Hogenberg ed. Cologne, 1617. 325 x 405mm. Coloured.

Antique map of Deventer, J. Blaue, 1649

Hamburg around 1700

F. de Witt, Hamburg around 1700, Copperplate print (from C. Schellenberg (ed.), Das alte Hamburg, Leipzig, 1936)

Tridentium – Trent; 1563; hand-coloured woodcut

Giovanni Andrea Vavassore, Tridentium – Trent; 1563; hand-coloured woodcut

Project Partners

Prof Fabrizio Nevola

Project Leader

University of Exeter
United Kingdom

Email

Prof. Dr. Daniel Bellingradt

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) 
Germany

Email

Prof Mónica Bolufer Peruga

Universitat de València
Spain

Email

Prof. Dr. Sabrina Corbellini

University of Groningen
Netherlands

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Dr. Massimo Rospocher

Italian-German Historical Institute
Italy

Email

  • University of Exeter

    University of Exeter

  • Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) 

    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) 

  • Universitat de València

    Universitat de València

  • University of Groningen

    University of Groningen

  • Italian-German Historical Institute

    Italian-German Historical Institute