EOC

Denim on stage: university meets industry at Denim City in Amsterdam

Event Date: 
Fri, 30/10/2015 - 09:00
Venue: 
Denim City, De Hallen
Location: 
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
External Website Address: 

Blue denim jeans are the most worn garments in the world. Even though denim is often perceived as a symbol of American culture, the denim fabric originated in Europe and has a long history. Yet it was only when denim trousers were riveted that the first modern pair of jeans were created in the late 19th century. Since this invention, jeans have made grand transformations from a worker’s garment, through a uniform of non-conformity and youth protest, to an item of fashion design. Meanwhile, the manufacturing of denim and jeans has been largely relocated from the USA to Japan, China, Brazil and Turkey. Recently, the Netherlands has become an international marketing cluster for the global denim industry.

The aim of this one-day conference is to explore the evolution of denim from its origins in the French town of Nîmes, through the American invention of the modern blue jeans, to the contemporary global manufacturing and marketing of denim and jeans.

Speakers include American, European and Japanese scholars, museum curators, and representatives of denim companies from Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, UK and USA. A round-table will discuss the future of denim and the conference will open the floor for debate.

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, this one-day public conference aims to bring together fashion researchers, professionals of the industry, curators, archivists, academics, students and wider public audiences.

Booking is essential as places are limited. The registration fee is €30 (€10 for students). To reserve a place and for further details regarding how to register, please email erasmusfashion@gmail.com or enterpriseofculture@leeds.ac.uk

This conference is organised by Erasmus University Rotterdam on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture: international structures and connections in the fashion industry since 1945, a three year pan-European collaborative research project funded by HERA II (Humanities in the European Research Area II), in collaboration with HTNK fashion recruitment & consultancy. The event is hosted by House of Denim in Denim City, Amsterdam.

Entrepreneurship in fashion: student, academic and industry perspectives

Event Date: 
Thu, 05/03/2015 - 09:30 to 18:30
Venue: 
James Watt Conference Centre
Location: 
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh
External Website Address: 

You are invited to a conference next March, organised by Heriot-Watt University on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture: International Structures and Connections in the Fashion Industry.

This public conference in Edinburgh will explore the changing structure of the European fashion business, with reference to the fashion intermediaries who work behind the scenes to run the fashion system. Moving beyond the ‘great designer’ focus in much of the literature on European fashion, Entrepreneurship in fashion: student, academic and industry perspectives examines the business professionals who ensure that fashion brands connect to the larger culture.

The conference will take the idea of fashion entrepreneurship and consider it in two slightly novel ways:

First, the day will give a platform for students, researching academics and active industry practitioners to offer their respective voices on what they consider to be the areas that deserve attention when it comes to academia.

The second area of novelty relates to those voices: they will not necessarily be rejoicing in the heroism of individual fashion designers and large companies, as is so often portrayed. Instead this conference will present some of the essential yet more rarely considered areas such as merchandising, buying, blogging, store design, digital innovation and more. As is the mission of the Enterprise of Culture project, there will also be an historical flavour to the day which complements these contemporary ideas.

We will welcome some of the best undergraduate fashion research currently taking place in Europe alongside influential industry entrepreneurs and leading academics. The principal aim of this conference is to engage multiple perspectives around the exciting concept of entrepreneurship in fashion and welcome thoughts, ideas and debate from the public, the industry and the research world.

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, the conference will bring together academics, fashion industry practitioners, students, archivists, museum curators, and wider public audiences.  The conference is free but booking is essential as places are limited. See here for booking information.

Further details are available on the project website or email enterpriseofculture@leeds.ac.uk.

Image courtesy of Hagley Museum and Library

Harnessing uncertainty: social, cultural and economic capital in fashion

Event Date: 
Thu, 10/03/2016 - 09:30
Venue: 
James Watt Conference Centre, Heriot-Watt University
Location: 
Edinburgh
External Website Address: 

You are invited to a conference this spring, organised by Heriot-Watt University and the University of Leeds on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture: International Structures and Connections in the Fashion Industry.

Harnessing uncertainty: social, cultural and economic capital in fashion will take you on a journey through contemporary fashion.

As the world continues to become more and more uncertain with questions relating to technological advances and environmental concerns so, too, does the fashion industry.

The fashion industry grapples with reinterpreting traditional ideas relating to national, cultural and gender identities. It attempts to address the impact the fashion system has on the planet on an environmental and human level. Vast technological shifts alter the way we expect to engage with fashion and the way fashion attempts to engage with us. In an ever-changing world, we see fashion as a cultural phenomenon, attending to new challenges and reconciling its responsibility over trends such as fast fashion.

This one-day conference will examine the current state of fashion against the backdrop of an uncertain world. It will consider some of the ways in which fashion attempts to address global concerns rather than being part of the cause.

Harnessing uncertainty: social, cultural and economic capital in fashion will provide a platform for speakers and delegates to question assumptions about the contemporary fashion industry and to scrutinise the place of fashion amidst some of the dominant global issues of today.

Speakers from the UK, USA and the Netherlands will discuss topics such as sustainability, Chinese identity and fashion, fashion blogging as labour and leisure, new perspectives on the suit, challenges and opportunities facing fashion designers, the European fashion business since 1945, and conscientious fashion.

A round-table will consider conference themes in more depth and will open the floor for debate.

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, this event will bring together academics, fashion industry practitioners, professionals, students, archivists, museum curators and wider public audiences. It is free to attend but registration is required as places are limited. Please book your place here.

The conference begins with registration and refreshments from 9.30am, with the sessions starting at 10.00am. Lunch will be provided. The event ends with a drinks reception from 5.00 to 6.00pm.

For more details, see the project website www.enterpriseofculture.leeds.ac.uk or email enterpriseofculture@leeds.ac.uk

Image © Enterprise of Culture

Interrogating intellectual property rights: fashion and design

Event Date: 
Fri, 12/06/2015 - 09:00
Venue: 
Lucy Smiths hus
Location: 
University of Oslo, Blindern, 0316 Oslo
External Website Address: 

You are invited to a conference in June, organised by the University of Oslo on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture: International Structures and Connections in the Fashion Industry.

Interrogating intellectual property rights: fashion and design will examine the question of fashion and design’s intellectual property rights (IPR) in the diachronic framework of the post-war period, by bringing together researchers and museum professionals across the fields of law, design and fashion history, business and economic history, and anthropology.

Taking place on Friday 12 June 2015 at the University of Oslo, this free public conference will investigate a range of exciting cases entangled in shared histories, from the rise of corporate identity design, criminalization of fashion piracy, and a biography of the Danish PH Lamp, to Hells Angels’ tough protection of the power of their gang insignia vis-à-vis fashionable imitators.

Speakers from the UK, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands and USA will consider questions such as what counts as original or as an innovation, and to what degree should and can these be protected in the face of cheap copies and knock-offs flooding the markets at an unprecedented speed? And who has the definition power and the leverage in the form of market access and higher levels of protection in foreign markets?

Open to anyone with an interest in the law, design/fashion history, business/economic history and anthropology, the conference will bring together academics, fashion and design industry practitioners, students, archivists, museum curators, and wider public audiences.  It is free to attend but booking is essential as places are limited. To register, please click here.

For more information, including the programme, please see the project website.

Swedish Innovations and High Street Fashion: Past, Present and Future

Event Date: 
Thu, 27/03/2014 - 13:00 to 17:00
Venue: 
Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design
Location: 
Stockholm
External Website Address: 

You are invited to attend a public conference this spring, organised in collaboration with the Centre for Business History in Stockholm, Sweden.

Featuring talks from fashion business professionals, academics in the fields of business history and archivists, this event considers aspects of the fashion industry during the latter half of the twentieth century.

The conference will address questions such as:

  • How has the fashion industry, particularly fashion retailing, evolved in the past century?
  • How can it be understood historically?
  • What can we expect from the future?

Moderated by Ingrid Giertz Mårtenson, the event includes the following speakers:

Regina Lee Blaszcyzyk, School of History, University of Leeds, History on the High Street

Ulrika Berglund, Stockholm University and Carina Gråbacke, Gothenburg University, Swedish fashion industry in the 20th Century

Jakob Östberg, School of Business, Stockholm University, A consumer culture perspective on fashion as taste regimes

Lena Patriksson Keller, founder of Patriksson Communications and Chairman of ASFB, the Association of Swedish Fashion Brands, The Shift in Fashion Communication

Alexander Husebye, CEO, Centre for Business History Stockholm, Why History Marketing

Jörgen Andersson, Global Marketing Director at the Japanese fashion retailer Uniqlo (and 25 years in H&M), ‘It’s not what you do but how you do it’

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, this event is particularly aimed at academics (e.g. in history, business, fashion), post-graduate students, curators, archivists, fashion designers, textile-related organisations and wider public audiences.

The event is free but places are limited. Registration required by 24 March with anna.linderoth@naringslivshistoria.se who will also supply further information.

This event is organised by the Centre for Business History, on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture

The Enterprise of Culture: the European fashion system around the world

Event Date: 
Fri, 10/06/2016 - 10:30
Venue: 
V&A
Location: 
London
External Website Address: 

Friday 10 June 2016
10.30am to 5.30pm
Victoria and Albert Museum
South Kensington, London
Register here

You are invited to the final project conference for The Enterprise of Culture, a three-year European collaborative research project investigating international structures and connections in the fashion industry since 1945.

Fashion is often studied from a purely theoretical perspective, from a costume history or dress history viewpoint or from a popular media-driven vantage point.

The Enterprise of Culture breaks new ground, using the fashion business to examine how various types of cultural encounters – between ‘core’ fashion cities such as Paris and London and ‘peripheral’ areas such as Sweden and Scotland, between style labs and the high street, and between fibre makers, clothing manufacturers and retailers – stimulated innovation and created a new and competitive industry.

This one day event showcases exciting new research undertaken by the Enterprise of Culture project team and offers an insight into the European fashion industry around the world, looking at topics such as influential brands from Biba and Mary Quant to today’s H&M, Italian fashion and the role of the department store buyer, Scottish tartan and tweed, the international reach of British textiles, luxury and fashion.

Speakers include representatives from the V&A, the Centre for Business History Stockholm, the Yorkshire Fashion Archive, the fashion industry and researchers from the universities of Leeds, Oslo, Newcastle, Erasmus Rotterdam, Heriot Watt and St Andrews.

We welcome guest speaker Edwina Ehrman, Curator of the V&A’s exciting new exhibition, Undressed: A Brief History of Underwear who will take a close look at the creation and marketing of a luxury lingerie brand, Janet Reger.

Fashion journalist, Lou Stoppard, will chair a roundtable discussion made up of representatives from the fashion industry to consider the conference themes in more depth and open the floor for debate.

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, this event will bring together academics, fashion industry practitioners, students, archivists, museum curators and wider public audiences. It is free to attend but registration is required as places are limited. Please book your place here.

The conference begins with registration and refreshments from 10.00am, with the sessions starting at 10.30am. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

The full programme can be found here.

The V&A will be open until 9.45pm, allowing participants the opportunity to explore the museum collections (please see here for more information: charges apply to some of the temporary exhibitions).

For more information, email enterpriseofculture@leeds.ac.uk

Image © Hagley Museum and Library

The History and Future of Fashion Prediction: University meets Industry

Event Date: 
Fri, 17/10/2014 - 09:00 to 18:00
Venue: 
Forum Zaal – M-Building, Erasmus University Rotterdam
Location: 
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
External Website Address: 

You are invited to a conference this autumn, organised by Erasmus University Rotterdam on behalf of The Enterprise of Culture: International Structures and Connections in the Fashion Industry. This one-day event will bring together the scholarly world of fashion research and professionals of the international fashion industry, and opens the floor for debate.

Fashion prediction has played a tremendous role in the transformation of the fashion industry worldwide since the interwar period. However, fashion prediction is little understood by the public, despite the fact that it dramatically influences the collections every season. Although intermediaries and mediators have been active in the consolidating process of the fashion industry, their role has only been discussed recently by business history scholars.

The aim of this public conference is to explore the different forms and evolution of fashion prediction worldwide since the interwar period. Fashion prediction was and is exercised in different ways and by means of different institutions, including consulting companies, dedicated spaces during trade-fairs, department stores, dedicated divisions in major companies, and more recently, bloggers and internet trendsetting companies. The role and form of fashion predictions thus changed over time. This conference aims to find out how and why.

Speakers include American and European scholars, as well as representatives of the fashion prediction companies from Paris, New York and London. Professionals from the Amsterdam fashion world will comment on the fashion scene in the Netherlands and the role played by efficient fashion prediction. The Dutch experience will be compared internationally and confronted with existing theories on the fashion ecosystem.

Open to anyone with an interest in the business history of fashion, this event is particularly aimed at academics (e.g. in history, business, fashion), post-graduate students, curators, archivists, fashion industry, textile-related organisations and wider public audiences. Booking is essential as places are limited. The registration fee is €30 (€10 for students). See here for more information, including how to book.

Full details can be found on the project website: www.enterpriseofculture.leeds.ac.uk or email erasmusfashion@gmail.com

Image © Première Vision

The Enterprise of Culture: International Structures and Connections in the Fashion Industry since 1945 (EOC)

Popular media forms such as style magazines and ca- ble TV often reduce fashion to individual personalities. Designers from Coco Chanel to Alexander McQueen are depicted as visionaries who define changing trends, perhaps even new epochs. In reality, the fash- ion business is an extraordinarily complex industry that operates across national, cultural, economic, and social boundaries. Funded by the Humanities in the European Research Areas (HERA), this project seeks to explore the relationships in fashion as a cultural phe- nomenon and a business enterprise, and to examine the transmission of fashion as a cultural form across nation- al and international boundaries by intermediaries such as educational institutions, media outlets, advertisers, branders, trend forecasters, and retailers.

One of the major questions behind this project is how Europe rose from the ashes of World War II to rebuild and reshape its fashion industry, and how that indus- try has defined a European identity in modern times. The creation of fashion ecosystems, as embodied in the branding of so-called fashion cities and a network of fashion weeks and fashion fairs, has contributed to the re-building of nations. European state and city govern- ments increasingly dedicated resources to the fashion business in the postwar era. This made sense economi- cally and culturally because fashion allows nations to “invent” and “re-invent” traditions, both as a central part of diaspora economics and as a symbol of the im- agined communities of Europe as an assemblage of nations and of regions.

This project seeks to deepen our understanding of these developments using an interdisciplinary approach that explores the relationships among enterprise and culture. Fashion is often studied from a purely theo- retical perspective, from a costume history or dress history viewpoint, or from a popular media-driven van- tage point. EOC breaks new ground, using the fashion business to examine how various types of cultural en- counters – between “core” fashion cities such as Paris and London and “peripheral” areas such as Sweden and Scotland, between style labs and the high street, and between fibre makers, clothing manufacturers, and re- tailers – stimulated innovation, and created a new and competitive industry.

Over the next three years, the EOC team will hold a series of workshops, conferences, and public pro- grammes, will produce articles and books, and will launch a pilot oral history programme on the history of the European fashion business. Our team of historians and management scholars has a strong commitment to public understanding and will work closely with non- academic institutions, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Centre for Business History in Stockholm, the Marks and Spencer Company Archive in Leeds, and the sponsors of fashion-textile trade fairs throughout Europe, including Première Vision, Bread & Butter, and Messe Frankfurt.

For more information, see the project website: www.enterpriseofculture.leeds.ac.uk

Associated Partners: 

AP-1: Sonnet Stanfill, Victoria and Albert Museum, UK, S.Stanfill@vam.ac.uk

AP-2: Mr Alexander Husebye, Centre for Business History Stockolm (CBHS), SE, alexander.husebye@naringslivshistoria.se

EOC

Professor Regina Lee Blaszczyk

Title: 
PI-1
Institution: 
University of Leeds, UK
Address: 
University of Leeds, UK
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
R.Blaszczyk@leeds.ac.uk
Project Title: 
EOC
Forenames: 
Regina Lee
Surname: 
Blaszczyk
Personal Title: 
Professor

Professor Robert MacIntosh

Title: 
PI-6
Institution: 
Heriot-Watt University
Address: 
Heriot-Watt University, UK
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
Robert.MacIntosh@hw.ac.uk
Project Title: 
EOC
Forenames: 
Robert
Surname: 
MacIntosh
Personal Title: 
Professor

Pages

Subscribe to EOC