ENCARC

Dr Lars Jensen

Title: 
PI-3
Institution: 
University of Roskilde
Country: 
Denmark
E-mail: 
hopeless@ruc.dk

A wide-ranging literary/cultural scholar with research interests in Nordic colonialisms—including Denmark’s relationship with Greenland—Lars has worked previously on issues relating to travel and cultural identity in the Nordic countries. He has also recently published on the global politics of climate change.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Lars
Surname: 
Jensen
Personal Title: 
Dr

Dr Britt Kramvig

Title: 
PI-4
Institution: 
University of Tromsø
Address: 
University of Tromsø, NO
Country: 
Norway
E-mail: 
britt.kramvig@uit.no
Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Britt
Surname: 
Kramvig
Personal Title: 
Dr

Dr Berit Kristoffersen

Title: 
University lecturer
Institution: 
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Country: 
Norway
E-mail: 
berit.kristoffersen@uit.no

Berit is a political geographer and PhD-candidate at University of Tromsø. Her doctorate research focus on the imagining of the Arctic as a ‘peak relief’ in Norwegian oil politics, and competing economic and cultural visions of the future across scale through ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with industry elites and local stakeholders in Lofoten and Vesterålen (the most contested region in the north). Røst in Lofoten will be one of the key sites in the HERA-project that will explore and visualize autonomy in sub-Arctic coastal tourism.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Berit
Surname: 
Kristoffersen
Personal Title: 
Dr

Michael Leonard

Title: 
Doctoral Candidate
Institution: 
University of Iceland
Country: 
Iceland
E-mail: 
mrl6@hi.is

Michael is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and Tourism at the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences at the University of Iceland. He examines how socio-cultural, geopolitical and environmental discourses have shaped (internal and external) representations of Iceland while positioning it as a wilderness and gateway global tourist destination. Michael holds a BA in European Studies and Business from New York University and a joint MSc in Sustainable Tourism Management from the University of Southern Denmark, the University of Ljubljana and the University of Girona as part of the European Master’s in Tourism Management degree. His previous research has focused on sustainable tourism development, land stewardship and conservation, destination image formation, effects of cultural imperialism and LGBT tourism. Michael is deeply motivated by his interest in travel, writing, culture and the nexus between all three.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Michael
Surname: 
Leonard

Professor Kristín Loftsdóttir

Title: 
Professor of Anthropology
Institution: 
University of Iceland
Country: 
Iceland
E-mail: 
kristinl@hi.is

Kristín’s research, based on postcolonial theories and anthropology, has focused on whiteness, gender and racial identity, as well as issues of international development and nationalism. She has carried out fieldwork in Niger and, more recently, Iceland. Kristín has published in journals including Ethnicities, Identities, Social Identities and The European Journal of Women’s Studies, and has co-edited the books Teaching ‘Race’ with a Gendered Edge (Atgender and CEU Press, 2012) and Postcolonialism and Whiteness in the Nordic Region (Ashgate, 2012). Her Icelandic-language book Konan sem fékk spjót í höfuðið (The Woman who got a spear in her head: The strangeness of methodology) was awarded the Fjöruverðlaunin (Icelandic Women’s Literature Prize) for scholarly book of the year in 2010.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Kristín
Surname: 
Loftsdóttir
Personal Title: 
Professor

Dr Katrín Anna Lund

Title: 
PI-5
Institution: 
University of Iceland
Address: 
University of Iceland, IS
Country: 
Iceland
E-mail: 
kl@hi.is

Katrín is an anthropologist based in the department of Geography and Tourism. She has published on topics such as landscape, tourism, walking, the senses and narratives in Spain,Scotland and Iceland. In recent years she has been working on a project about destination creation based on a fieldwork in north west Iceland. Currently she is conducting a work about Northern light tourism in collaboration with researchers from Alta, Norway and Rovaniemi, Finland.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Katrín Anna
Surname: 
Lund
Personal Title: 
Dr

Dr Roger Norum

Title: 
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Institution: 
University of Leeds
E-mail: 
r.norum@leeds.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44 7525 006 807

Roger is a social anthropologist whose research focuses on time, space and sociality in transient communities. His prior research focused on the liminal among Western expatriates in Nepal, and he has also worked as a translator, magazine editor and travel writer. Roger’s interest in the Arctic is linked to several areas, including the anthropology of writing, social imaginaries, experiences of mobility/immobility and mapmaking.

Project Title: 
ENCARC
Forenames: 
Roger
Surname: 
Norum
Personal Title: 
Dr

Call for Papers: The Postcolonial Arctic Conference (Leeds, UK), deadline 28 February

External Website Address: 

The Call for Papers is open for The Postcolonial Arctic, a two-day conference in Leeds sponsored by Arctic Encounters that seeks to apply postcolonial theories and methods to the European Arctic. The conference thus makes the case for a ‘postcolonial Arctic’ in which locally articulated desires to decolonise the region are seen in both ecological and cultural-political terms. The current global scramble for the Arctic can be seen in terms of a centuries-long pursuit of material wealth and political purchase in the region that has hardly diminished for the various colonial and commercial powers concerned (Craciun 2009). The Arctic might thus be described as having both a colonial past and a colonial present, and the conference will look to operate with this double understanding of the postcolonial: as both a painful negotiation of the legacies of earlier eras and a reckoning––in many ways equally damaging––with those new forms of colonialism that have surfaced in today’s globalised world. But the event also seeks to operate with a third, more hopeful understanding of the postcolonial: as setting up the parameters for both imaginative and material transformation so as to support cultural and political autonomy, but also to create the conditions for a more ‘planetary’ (cosmopolitan, socially and ecologically balanced) vision of the world. Confirmed speakers include Michael Bravo (Cambridge), Kari Herbert (Polarworld) and Tero Mustonen (Snowchange Collective, Finland).

The conference welcomes papers from postgraduate and early-career scholars from across all disciplines, theoretical and empirical angles. Topics might include (but are not limited to):

•    Arctic colonialisms past and present
•    Arctic environments and ecologies
•    Indigenous presences in and perspectives on the Arctic
•    Arctic explorations, travels and tourisms
•    Imaginaries of the Arctic and of the North
•    Encounters between residents of and travellers to the Arctic (and/or within these two groups)
•    Antarctic perspectives, comparative or otherwise

The deadline for abstracts is 28 February, 2014. Abstracts (with title, contact details and affiliation) of max 200 words are to be sent to co-convenors Prof Graham Huggan (g.d.m.huggan@leeds.ac.uk) and Roger Norum (r.norum@leeds.ac.uk) by this date. Arctic and/or postcolonial scholars from outside the UK are particularly encouraged to apply.

 

Report: Inntravel Discovery Day

External Website Address: 

On December 6th, Arctic Encounters’ partner Inntravel held a Discovery Day at the Harrogate International Centre in North Yorkshire. Hoteliers and suppliers from around the world who work with Inntravel brought their local wares to Harrogate to share with clients – a collection of both old friends and new ones. It was a lively day, with fabulous food products being tasted, lots of wine and chat, and a friendly atmosphere. An Italy stand practically doubled as a deli counter, overflowing with delicious Mediterranean treats and a warm southern European welcome for arriving guests. Customers were literally queuing around the block for the door to open, and while some were just browsing and enjoying the mini-tour of Europe (and India), others were keenly intent on making preliminary bookings for future holidays. New suppliers including Hotel Gjaargadur in Gjogv, Faroes, (which Arctic Encounters had the privilege of visiting earlier in the year) drew great interest, as well as the trio from ‘Norway Home of Skiing’ who helped keep things lively. Various suppliers were also speaking to eager audiences in two parallel information sessions, to introduce their holidays and tell people about their region.

Inntravel puts on a Discovery Day every three years, so Arctic Encounters were delighted to be invited to present a short lecture entitled ‘Are we Loving the Arctic to Death?’ An eager audience were keen to know more about how to travel ethically in the Arctic region, and where to find environmentally sustainable tours. Inntravel are clearly the experts here, with their Slow Travel philosophy, so it was a pleasure to contribute to the discussion.

As part of the day’s events, Inntravel had organised a blogging workshop. Like many travel companies, Inntravel are tackling the changing media world by rethinking their communications strategies. It is a challenge to keep relationships going between company and clients when bookings can be made far in advance of holidays, without going over the top and bothering people. It is no longer enough to send out brochures and wait and see if anyone responds. At the same time, feedback from clients now comes instantly – in emails and tweets, for example, sometimes while people are actually on their holidays. One way to harness all this interaction is to facilitate client-to-client communication, and to use blogs and company magazines (both on and offline) to share more than can be included in brochures, which are useful but may be limited.

A roundtable panel – or rather, a panel of speakers sitting at a long table – discussed the challenges of blogging, the use of different registers of language, and the difficulties of making a living by professional travel writing, in blogging or print, as well as the increasing pressure from media outlets to include video as well as text and photography. Blogger Andy Montgomery of Buzztrips, and Richard Hammond ofGreentraveller, both have many years of experience in this field. They shared their thoughts about combining blogging and other work into what we might fashionably call ‘portfolio careers’, and about building relationships with clients and companies. Arctic Encounters spread the message that academic researchers, too, are also keen to communicate in accessible language and to share our knowledge, as well as to co-produce knowledge with our partners (such as Inntravel). Another illustration of our keenness to do this is our exciting recent workshop in Tromsø that brought together whale-watching operators from across the northern counties of Norway (we’ll have more on that news soon).

This Discovery Day also marked Inntravel’s 30th birthday, and we were delighted to be invited to celebrate with them in style at Harrogate’s splendid Crown Hotel at a Gala Dinner with company staff and suppliers. With Yorkshire food – and wine – and entertainment, it was a night to remember.

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