Rhythm Changes

Professor Walter van de Leur

Title: 
Professor of Jazz and Improvised Music
Institution: 
University of Amsterdam
Address: 
Department of Musicology, University of Amsterdam, Spuistraat 210, 1012 VT Amsterdam
E-mail: 
W.vandeLeur@uva.nl

Since September 2007, I have been Professor of Jazz and Improvised Music at the University of Amsterdam whilst working as Research coordinator in the Jazz and Classical Master’s program at the Conservatory of Amsterdam. This post requires me to deliver Music history electives in the Jazz Masters program and teach jazz history for the Bachelors programme. Working across both University and Conservatoire settings has provided me with valuable insights into different musical environments and has enabled me to develop research interests that are both practically and theoretically focused.

Research Interests: 

Jazz Studies, Musicology, Dutch Jazz, Billy Strayhorn and Duke Ellington, Jazz Education

Publications: 

Van de leur, W., “‘People Wrap Their Lunches in Them’: Duke Ellington and His Written Music Manuscripts”. In: John Howland and Ed Green, ed. Duke Ellington Studies Anthology. New York: Cambridge University Press (forthcoming)

Van de Leur, W., The Real Birth of the Cool: Orchestral Jazz in the 1940s. New York: Oxford University Press (forthcoming)

Van de Leur, W., Guest-editorial for Jazz Perspectives themed issue on DukeEllington,(forthcoming)

Van de Leur, W., “Moon Dreams: Rediscovered Music of Gil Evans and Gerry Mulligan.” Challenge Records CR 73275, 2008. Practice-based research project of hitherto unperformed works of Gerry Mulligan and Gil Evans which I rediscovered, critically edited and prepared for performance.

Dutch Jazz Orchestra. “The Lady Who Swings the Band: Rediscovered Music of Mary Lou Williams.” Challenge Records, 2005

Van de Leur, W., Something to Live For: The Music of Billy Strayhorn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. Winner of the 2003 Irving Lowens Book Award (Society for American Music) and 2003 Award for Best Research in Recorded Jazz Music (Association of Recorded Sound Collections)

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Tom Sykes

Title: 
PhD Student
Institution: 
University of Salford
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
tomsykes29@btinternet.com
External Website Address: 

I am a PhD student in the school of Music Media and Performance at the University of Salford researching the effect of digital technology on the dissemination and consumption of ‘niche’ genres of popular music.  Enough to be going on with you might think? But I’ve recently had a chapter of my work accepted for publication in a forthcoming Ashgate book about European popular music. The book chapter, provisionally titled ‘Transgressing borders in cyberspace’, discusses the way in which recorded music is now so easily distributed over the internet, transgressing not only geographical borders but often stylistic differences, language barriers and censorship laws, not to mention copyright legislation and royalty agreements.

The area of music I’m researching is ‘niche’ or ‘specialist’ popular music, with a particular focus on jazz, looking particularly at how digital media, especially the internet, have affected the dissemination and consumption of jazz.  I will also be undertaking audience questionnaire surveys and interviews at selected jazz festivals, and carrying out online surveys.

I’ve also presented research at several conferences including; the Sound Property conference (Salford, 2009); Mediating Jazz conference (Manchester, 2009) and the Leeds International Jazz Conference 2010.

Research Interests: 

Jazz Studies

Music and New Media

Jazz Education

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Professor Tony Whyton

Institution: 
University of Salford
Address: 
School of Media, Music and Performance, University of Salford, Adelphi Building, Peru Street, Salford Greater Manchester, M3 6EQ
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
t.whyton@salford.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44 (0)161 2957245

Over the past 13 years, I have developed an international reputation for my research work both in terms of individual outputs and research leadership. My research work deals specifically with music and its place within the creative industries, from the packaging of popular music to the iconic representations of jazz artists. I have also played an important role in promoting research as an enterprise and knowledge transfer activity, working closely with a variety of academic and professional bodies and disseminating my work in different contexts. As the founding editor of the international journal the source: challenging jazz criticism, I created the first peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal for jazz studies. Subsequently, I have developed my role as co-editor of the Jazz Research Journal with Equinox Publishing, expanding the editorial board and scope of the journal. My first book, entitled Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition for Cambridge University Press, was published in 2010. My 2nd book, Beyond A Love Supreme is a cross disciplinary study of the musical and cultural influence of John Coltrane’s seminal album, and will be published by Oxford University Press in 2012. In addition to my book projects, I edited the jazz volume of the 8-volume Library of Essays on Popular Music with Ashgate, due for publication in 2011, and have contributed a chapter entitled ‘Europe and the New Jazz Studies’ to an edited volume on European Jazz, to be published by Northeastern University Press in 2011. This publication will be a significant output for the HERA Rhythm Changes project.

Research Interests: 

The New Jazz Studies, Music and Cultural Identity, Critical Musicology, Myth and Ideology, Post-Colonial Studies

Publications: 

Whyton, T., Beyond A Love Supreme (New York: Oxford University Press, forthcoming)

 

Whyton, T. (ed.), Jazz [Library of Essays on Popular Music] (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011)

 

Whyton, T., ‘Jazz Research in Britain’ Jazzforschung/Jazz Research 42, (November 2010), pp.131-146

 

Whyton, T., Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010)

 

Whyton, T., ‘Acting on Impulse! Recordings and the Reification of Jazz’, Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections (Mine Dogantan-Dack (ed.)).Middlesex University Press, November 2008, pp.155-171. ISBN-10: 1904750273

 

Whyton, T., ‘Four for Trane: Jazz and the Disembodied Voice’, Jazz Perspectives (October 2007) - Vol.1 No 2, pp.115-132. ISSN: 1749-4060

 

Whyton, T., ‘Birth of the School: discursive methodologies in jazz education’, Music Education Research (March 2006) - Vol.8 No.1, pp.65-81. ISSN: 1461-3808

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes
Forenames: 
Tony
Surname: 
Whyton
Personal Title: 
Professor

Europe Jazz Network report

Europe Jazz Network has recently published an evaluative research study of its membership. Two documents have been published – an executive summary document outlining the main findings from the research, and an extensive research study displaying both qualitative and quantitative data on the network and its membership. As a member of the research steering group, Rhythm Changes Project leader Tony Whyton was invited to write a foreword for the full report and to share Rhythm Changes’ interviews and case study materials gathered over the last year. The report provides crucial financial and structural information about jazz organisations across Europe and the report will be used by national agencies, promoters, festivals and policy makers to highlight the impact of jazz in different contexts, as well as the value of collaboration and transnational working. The report also features case studies on organisations based in our partner countries and showcases the work of Rhythm Changes researcher Christophe de Bezenac’s group Trio VD (who are quoted as part of a case study on the 12 Points! festival. There’s also a photo of the group on page 15!). Over the past year, Christophe was selected to participate in the UK’s Take 5 scheme, and the EJN report includes a case study of the way in which this professional development programme has been extended to the European level. This is a significant collaborative output for Rhythm Changes and a fantastic example of how Knowledge Exchange is embedded in the research ethos of the project. The full report and Executive Summary can also be downloaded via the EJN website link above.

PULSE - new media project at the Maijazz Festival Stavanger

External Website Address: 

Over the next week, several Rhythm Changes team members will be working together on a web and performance project.  There will be a performance at the Maijazz festival in Stavanger on Thursday 12 May featuring the Kitchen Orchestra and two Japanese visual artists.  Leading up to that event, Rhythm Changes researcher Andrew Dubber will be live-blogging, using video and other online tools to provide an insight into the process and the thinking behind that event.

This project feeds directly into the Rhythm Changes research questions concerning trans-national practice, the construction of community and the ways in which jazz is mediated in new media environments.

Follow the project, share ideas and get involved via the following link http://kitchenorchestra.tumblr.com or visit the Rhythm Changes website (www.rhythmchanges.net) for further information.

Rhythm Changes at Tou Scene

The first in a series of European Rhythm Changes concerts took place on 14 January, as Irish composer and bandleader Dave Kane conducted the Bjergsted Jazzensemble at Tou Scene in Stavanger, an ex-brewery that has now become a cultural centre and hub of creativity in the Norwegian city.  ‘It was one of those magical live moments where space, audience, and musicians, blend together into a genuinely communal experience’, said Principal Investigator Dr Petter Frost Fadnes.
The concert, co-promoted by Tou Scene and the University of Stavanger, generated a large amount of press interest, resulting in one national radio broadcast on NRK P2's Kulturnytt, one newspaper article, and two magazine articles to be published shortly. Frost Fadnes continued, ‘All the journalists I’ve spoken to are genuinely interested in the potential outcome of the Rhythm Changes comparative study. The question of, for example, whether particular aesthetic qualities stand out between different ensembles, cities or national scenes, seems to fascinate the public, professionals and students alike.’
The NRK P2 Kulturnytt show, broadcast on 14 January, can be accessed for a limited period via the following link: http://www.nrk.no/programmer/sider/kulturnytt/
The programme features interviews with Petter Frost Fadnes and Dave Kane as well as music from the event.
Image by Karina Gytre

Rhythm Changes commission

External Website Address: 
Award-winning photographer Paul Floyd Blake has been commissioned to undertake a project that feeds into the core themes of Rhythm Changes. Floyd Blake describes himself as a mixed race, Jamaican-English photographer who explores identity through documentary and portraiture.   He won the prestigious Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize at the National Portrait Gallery in 2009 for his picture of Rosie Bancroft (pictured) and, over the past few years, has been working on several projects linked to the 2012 Cultural Olympiad. In undertaking the Rhythm Changes commission, Floyd Blake will attend a number of festivals and events throughout 2012 in order to engage with the cultural dynamics of jazz, the music’s social ambience and the relationship between music and its social settings. Floyd Blake’s work will be exhibited as part of the next Rhythm Changes conference in March/April 2013, and the team hopes to secure a second exhibition in London in June 2013. Watch this space!

Rhythm Changes headlines Leeds International Jazz Conference

Tony Whyton, Project Leader for the Rhythm Changes project, will deliver a keynote presentation at the 2011 Leeds International Jazz Conference. The conference will explore the theme 'Time Captured - Jazz Composition, Composing and Composers' and Tony’s keynote will be entitled, ‘Jazz, Composition and Critical Discourse’. The presentation will feed off research questions addressed by the Rhythm Changes project, from exploring tensions between high and low culture to examining the shifting status of jazz as a canonical artform, from offering alternatives to dominant traditions to considering the role of collectives in jazz as a transnational European practice.

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