Rhythm Changes

Andrew Dubber

Title: 
Senior Researcher
Institution: 
Birmingham City University
Address: 
Birmingham School of Media, BCU
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
dubber@gmail.com
External Website Address: 

I’m Reader in Music Industries Innovation at Birmingham City University and a member of the Centre for Media and Cultural Research. As well as my work researching music online, I am also a lecturer, author, consultant, public speaker, jazz broadcaster and blogger. My research interests include digital media cultures, online music enterprise, the mediation of jazz in the digital age, and music as culture.

I’m the founder of New Music Strategies and Music Think Tank, a board member of Un-Convention, as well as a member of the board of advisors for Bandcamp.

At Birmingham City University, I teach Music Online, Music Industry theory & practice and Music Radio Programming. I also guest lecture in media ecology and the impact of technological change, radio documentary production, radio drama production, entrepreneurship and innovation, blogging and social media, and the digital environment as narrative space.

My public lectures have included talks on the importance of copyright reform in the digital age; the act of blogging as storytelling; the evolution of media; the impact of technological change on music; music as cultural identity; broadcasting policy and music culture; radio in the digital age; specialist music radio and online fandom; jazz consumption practices in the digital age; the impact of digital technology on human cognition; as well as online strategies for marketing and distributing independent music.

Research Interests: 

Dubber is internationally recognised as a leading consultant and academic in new strategies and technologies for the radio and the music industries.

Publications: 

Books, Chapters, Articles

  • 2005 – ‘The Digitalisation of New Zealand Radio’ in The Great New Zealand Radio Experience, Karen Neill and Morris W Shanahan (Eds), Thomson Dunmore Press (pp 67-87)
  • 2006 – New broadcast technologies UNESCO [co-author] (forthcoming)

Conference Contributions

  • 2003 – ‘Radio and the Internet’, Between Empires Conference, Auckland
  • 2003 – ‘There’s no such thing as Internet Radio’, The Radio Conference: A Transnational Forum, Madison, WI
  • 2005 – ‘Radio Question Time’ panel, MeCCSA/AMPE conference, Lincoln
  • 2005 – ‘Radio, Digitalisation and the Laws of Media’, Radio Studies Network Conference, Birmingham
  • 2005 – ‘There is no ‘We’ in iPod’, The First European Communication Conference, Amsterdam
  • 2006 – ‘Online Music Enterprise’, MeCCSA/AMPE Conference, Leeds, January 2006
  • 2006 – ‘Jazz, Radio and National Identity in New Zealand’, Leeds International Jazz Conference, Leeds
  • 2006 – ‘New Zealand On Air’, Sounding Out Conference, Sunderland
Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Christa Bruckner Haring

Title: 
Research Assistant
Institution: 
University of Music and Performing Arts Graz
Country: 
Austria
E-mail: 
c.bruckner-haring@kug.ac.at
External Website Address: 

I obtained a B.A. in Piano Instrumental Study and a M.A. in Music Education at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz, and Spanish Philology at the Karl-Franzens-University of Graz; my master’s thesis was entitled Somnis irracionals: A composition to paintings of Salvador Dalí. Since 2008 I have worked as a research assistant at the Institute for Jazz Research of the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz. I am currently working on my Ph.D. on Cuban jazz pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba, exploring his compositional techniques and his method of combining traditional Cuban and jazz elements in his own music. In addition to my work for Rhythm Changes and my research on European jazz cultures, my research interests include transcriptions and musical analyses from a range of jazz and popular music styles (e.g. lectures and publications on Anthony Braxton, John Coltrane, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Cuban music and “latin jazz”).

Research Interests: 

Jazz Studies

Austrian Jazz

Musicology

Music Pedagogy

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Dr Anne Dvinge

Title: 
Danish Research Council for the Humanities Post Doctoral Fellow
Institution: 
University of Copenhagen
Address: 
Faculty of Humanities, Department of Arts and Cultural Studies Karen Blixensvej 1, 2300 København S Denmark
E-mail: 
advinge@hum.ku.dk
Telephone: 
+45 (0)3532 9268

From 1996 to 2001, I was employed at Copenhagen JazzHouse as Information Officer and host to musicians arriving from abroad. From 2001 to 2002, I took on the position as Music Director of a small experimental scene and café, based on the principles of 20th Cent. Danish culture radicalism, in particular the ideas of Poul Henningsen (PH). I have maintained an extensive network in the jazz business/community, both in Denmark and abroad, and serve today on the Board of Representatives at Copenhagen JazzHouse. After completing my MA in Comparative Literature from University of Copenhagen in 2001, I moved to London in 2002 where I lived and worked for 2 years as the Information Officer at The Disability Foundation in North London. However, finding that I missed the intellectual challenge of academic work, in 2004 I applied for and received one of 18 3-year PhD fellowships that are awarded every year in the Humanities at University of Copenhagen. Near the end of my fellowship I handed in my dissertation a month early and was awarded a PhD for my thesis, Between History and Hearsay: Imagining Jazz at the Turn of the 21st Century, in December 2007

Research Interests: 

My research lies in the interstices between jazz studies, cultural studies, and American studies. In my research, I point to jazz as a unique interdisciplinary prism, both in an American national and European transnational context. Through this I investigate the way narratives are formed around national and transnational identities and more importantly, how the interplay between these categories enables us to rethink them.

My current research project, Jazz – A Cosmopolitan Vernacular: Transnational Narratives of Identity and Tradition, seeks to investigate narratives of national and transnational identities in the context of the transatlantic jazz culture. As jazz continues to migrate across national, ethnic, and cultural borders, I wish to investigate how jazz and local music cultures interact and intermingle. The study will be based on case studies focusing on the jazz festival as both a geographical and physical place, but also a more abstract, symbolical space where national and trans-national identities and claims of belonging are negotiated by locals and visiting jazz musicians. I plan to work with at least 3 European jazz festivals and 2 American festivals, emphasizing how the transatlantic and transnational travels of both the music and its performers constitute both articulations of cosmopolitanism and strategies of the vernacular. The study will be published as a monograph as well as in peer reviewed articles.

Publications: 

Dvinge, A., ”Keeping time, constructing self: music as rooted cosmopolitanism in migration narratives.” Identity, Migration and Women's Bodies as Sites of Knowledge and Transgression, University of Malaga (December 2008)

Dvinge, A., “The Real Ambassadors” June 30. 2008 [30 Aug 2008] in America Adrift Stuart Noble & Bent Sørensen, eds., Available from:

Dvinge, A., “Geography is Fate: Jazz Places and Musical Spaces in Down Beat.” Leeds International Jazz Conference, Leeds College of Music (March 2008)

Dvinge, A., Between History & Hearsay: Imagining Jazz at the Turn of the 21st Century. PhD Dissertation, University of Copenhagen (2007)

Dvinge, A., “Renaissance of the Crescent City: Reflections on New Orleans as the Origin and Cradle of Jazz.” 7th International Conference of the Collegium for African American Research, UNED Madrid. (April 2007)

Dvinge, A., “Representations of Jazz in America at the Turn of the 21st Century” in Danish Yearbook of Musicology Vol. 34 (2006)

Dvinge, A., “Complex Fate - Complex Vision: The Vernacular and Identity in Ralph Ellison's Juneteenth”, Amerikastudien/American Studies 51:2, (2006)

Dvinge, A., “The Perfect Metaphor: Ken Burns’ Jazz.” Contemporary Cultures of Time and Space, Goldsmiths College & Copenhagen Doctoral School in Cultural Studies, Literature, and the Arts, University of Copenhagen. (June 2005)

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Dr Christophe de Bezenac

Title: 
Post-doctoral Researcher
Institution: 
University of Salford
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
chdebezenac@yahoo.com
External Website Address: 

I am a post-doctoral research fellow working as part of the University of Salford research team.  My work over the next 3 years will involve the mapping of jazz cultures in the UK and Norway and undertaking a comparison of jazz scenes in the 5 partner countries.

Between 2006 and 2009 I was the Research Officer for the ESRC-funded Investigating Musical Performance (IMP) working with colleagues from Leeds College of Music, the Institute of Education, the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama, and York University.

In addition to my work on Rhythm Changes, I am a French experimental saxophonist and researcher based in the UK.  After studying contemporary improvised musics and composition at the Strasbourg conservatoire, I went to Indonesia to learn West Javanese and Balinese gamelan where I became interested in the perceptual ambiguity of music. I then moved to the UK where I completed a Masters and Doctorate (Improvising Ambiguity: An Ecological Approach to Music-Making) at the University of Leeds, whilst becoming actively involved in the music scene. My present research – which draws from ecological psychology, cognitive neuroscience, ethnomusicology and his own performance practice – examines how delusions of control can put the perceptual boundaries of self into question and account for phenomena (such as trance, out of body experiences, and possession) often experienced during intense engagement in musical activities. My related musical interests lie at the fringes of jazz, electronic music, gamelan, DIY, European improvisation and electroacoustic music. I have performed at numerous international contemporary music and jazz festivals/venues around Europe, collaborating with artists from diverse musical backgrounds, such as Christian Sebille, Marc Ducret, Simon Fell, David Murray, Ken Vandemark, Paul Hession, Matthew Bourne, Fred Lonberg-Holm, Frank Vigroux, Chris Sharkey and Dave Kane

Research Interests: 

Jazz and Improvised Music

Performance Practice

Neuroscience and Music

Ecological Psychology

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Dr Nicholas Gebhardt

Title: 
Senior Researcher
Institution: 
Lancaster University
Address: 
Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
n.gebhardt@lancaster.ac.uk

My research interests include popular music in the United States, the entertainment industry, and jazz history and American ideology.  My first book, Going For Jazz: Musical Practices and American Ideology, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2001 and I have published articles and reviews in wide variety of forums on the cultural history of popular music in the United States.  In addition to my work on Rhythm Changes, I am currently working on a book called Music is our Business: the rise of the popular musician in American culture, 1882-1929 for the University of Chicago Press.

Research Interests: 

Popular music in the United States

Entertainment industry

Jazz history

Publications: 

Music is our Business: the rise of the popular musician in American culture, 1882-1929 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, forthcoming)

"Crossing borders I: the historical context for Ravel's North American tour" in Deborah Mawer, editor, Ravel Studies (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010)

Going For Jazz: Musical Practices and American Ideology (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001)

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Dr Petter Frost Fadnes

Title: 
Head of Jazz
Institution: 
University of Stavanger
Address: 
University of Stavanger, Department of Music and Dance, 4036 Stavanger, Norway
E-mail: 
petter.f.fadnes@uis.no
Telephone: 
+47 (0)51834006
Fax: 
+47 (0)5183405000
External Website Address: 

I am currently the Head of Jazz in the Department of Music and Dance at the University of Stavanger. In addition to this appointment, I have been the co-leader of the Kitchen Orchestra (www.kitchenorchestra.no), a Stavanger based big-band funded by Norsk Kulturråd (The Arts Council of Norway) since 2006 and, from 2008, I have, as a producer, been responsible for the promotion of activities of the ensemble. I have also provided management and production work for the nationwide contemporary music organisation Ny Musikk Rogaland (www.nymusikk.no) since 2008. As a performer and researcher, I have played with a range of internationally acclaimed musicians including: Keith Tippett, Keiji Haino, Steve Beresford, Paal Nilssen-Love, Nils Olav Johansen, Tomas Strønen, Matthew Bourne, Chris Sharkey, Dave Kane, Jason Yarde, Evan Parker, Paul Hession, Frode Gjerstad, Ken Vandermark. I currently perform with and co-lead the state-funded Kitchen Orchestra (www.kitchenorchestra.no/) and The Geordie Approach. Other performance projects have included The Thin Red Line, Metropolis, Quartet Alpha, and the LIMA Orchestra. Since 2007, I have organised successful performance tours in and across Europe involving several groups, visiting countries such as Norway, UK, Germany, France, and the Netherlands. As a composer I have written music for the group Metropolis (three album releases), as well as works for the trio The Thin Red Line and Kitchen Orchestra. In 2009, I secured funding from the Norwegian Foreign Office to support a European tour for The Geordie Approach (www.myspace.com/thegeordieapproach).

Research Interests: 

Practice-led research, performance, improvised music, music and architecture, composition

Publications: 

Frost Fadnes, P., “Alignment”, The Thin Red Line, Cadence Jazz Records, USA Recording) 2009

Frost Fadnes, P., Maijazz (Stavanger, Norway): 2009, Kitchen Orchestra with Keith Tippett

Frost Fadnes, P., “What’s Cooking” (Tou Scene, Stavanger, Norway): 2008, three-day festival with Kitchen Orchestra, guest Evan Parker

Frost Fadnes, P., Parsonage, C. and Taylor, J., ‘Integrating theory and practice in conservatoires: formulating holistic models for teaching and learning improvisation’ British Journal of Music Education, Volume 24, Issue 03 (Nov 2007), 295-312

Frost Fadnes, P., “Why Eye”, The Geordie Approach, Bruce’s Fingers, France (CD Recording), 2007 Frost Fadnes, P., “III”; Metropolis, MetroCD, UK (CD recording), 2006

Frost Fadnes, P., “Improvisational Architecture”, PhD thesis, University of Leeds 2004

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Loes Rusch

Title: 
PhD Student
Institution: 
University of Amsterdam
Country: 
The Netherlands
E-mail: 
loes.rusch@gmail.com
External Website Address: 

I am a PHD-student working as part of the University of Amsterdam research team. I obtained my M.A. at the University of Amsterdam, followed by a B.A. saxophone at the Jazz Department of the Conservatory of Amsterdam. For my master’s thesis Jazzpracticum: On the Institutionalization of Jazz Education in the Netherlands I studied the relation between formalized jazz education and concepts of national thought and identity in jazz.

As a part of the Rhythm Changes PHD Studentship I will further explore Dutch jazz cultures, focussing on national stereotyping, cultural identification and the relationship between global, national en local genres. My research will include mapping and collating of jazz-related data, including oral histories and musical compositions.

In addition to my work for Rhythm Changes I will continue to teach saxophone, organise workshops, and play baritone saxophone in various jazz- and pop groups.

Research Interests: 

Dutch Jazz

Musicology

Performance Practice

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Nick Katuszonek

Title: 
PhD Student
Institution: 
University of Salford
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
nmkatuszonek@yahoo.com
External Website Address: 

I am a drummer working in the area of contemporary improvised jazz.  I regularly collaborate with a number of leading improvising musicians, including Matthew Bourne, Petter Frost Fadnes and Christophe de Bezenac.

As part of the Rhythm Changes PhD studentship, I intend to investigate European approaches to performance, focusing on jazz drumming and the hybridisation of style.  Using a practice-led research methodology, I will explore the concept of national and transnational sounds in jazz and also want to examine the way in which drumming techniques normally found in commercial settings have found their way into more experimental musical practices.   One of my latest projects, for example, is an experiment which links free improvisation within the setting of a pop ensemble, playing pop tunes – Kate Bush meets Derek Bailey!

Over the past few years, I have worked as a lecturer at Leeds College of Music, teaching undergraduate and postgraduate students on both jazz and popular music courses.  My main interest has been the investigation of advance rhythmic concepts and techniques and the study of rhythm sections working on the cutting edge of Jazz and contemporary Pop/Dance music.  These experiences will certainly feed into my work on Rhythm Changes.

Research Interests: 

Jazz and Improvised Music

Performance Practice

National/transnational performance

Music pedagagy

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Professor Franz Kershbaumer

Title: 
Head of Department, Institute of Jazz Research
Institution: 
University of Music and Performing Arts Graz
Address: 
Institute of Jazz Research, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz, Leonhardstrasse 15, 8010 Graz
E-mail: 
franz.kerschbaumer@kug.ac.at
Telephone: 
+43 (0)316 389 3160
Fax: 
+43 (0)316 389 3161
External Website Address: 

From 1964 to 1972, I studied trumpet (classical and jazz) and contrabass at the University of Music and Performing Arts of Graz and, in 1977 I received a doctorate in musicology at the Karl-Franzens University of Graz (subsidiary subjects: history, philosophy). From 1970 to 1988, I worked as an assistant lecturer and research assistant at the Department of Jazz Research and the Department of Music Education of the University of Music and Performing Arts of Graz. In 1988, I was appointed to a professorship for popular music and musical practice in jazz at the University of Music and Performing Arts of Graz and have since delivered a range of lectures in the fields of jazz history, jazz analysis and popular music. Since 1992, I have worked as Head of the Department of Jazz Research. My main publications and fields of research enclose the topics history of jazz and popular music, jazz analysis, and the confluence of Western Art music and jazz. Since 1998, I have also been working as Head of the Academic Senate of the University of Music and Performing Arts of Graz. Further academic tasks comprise the membership and administration of various academic committees. As a performer, I have been the leader of several jazz bands (e.g. ‘Austria Consort’, ‘Jazz Traffic’, ‘Miles Davis Project’, ‘City Hall Jazz Band’), acting also as a composer and arranger, and playing the electric bass.

Research Interests: 

I have been the Editor-in-Chief of the international publication series Jazzforschung/Jazz Research and Beiträge zur Jazzforschung/Studies in Jazz Research since 1976. The series has produced 53 volumes to date and is now firmly established as one of the leading international publications for jazz studies. In addition to my editorial duties, I have played a significant part in organising events and research activities on an international level. For example, I have been the primary organiser for the biennial Internationaler Jazzwissenschaftlicher Kongress since 1977, the most recent event (May 2009) celebrated the diversity of jazz research cultures in different European contexts. I have worked as president of the International Society for Jazz Research since 1992 and have recently secured a contract with Northeastern University Press for an edited volume on ‘Jazz and Europe’ to be published in 2012. This will be the most extensive and wide ranging publication to date on European jazz and will provide a significant output for the Rhythm Changes project. My editorial work has been wide ranging, expanding to the re-edition of the encyclopedias “Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart” (MGG), and “Österreichisches Musiklexikon” and I have served as a delegate of the University of Music and Performing Arts of Graz at the prestigious “Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung” (FWF) of Austria, 1988 to 1992. The scope of my research work is evidenced from the range of international invited lectures and seminars given over the past 30 years. Within this context, I have presented lectures in jazz at the University of Vienna alongside international presentations in countries including the USA, Italy, Germany, and Scandinavia.

Publications: 

Kerschbaumer, F., Cerchieri, L., and Cugny, L. (eds.), “The Influence of Celtic Music on the origin of jazz“ in Cerhiari, L., Cugny, L., and Kerschbaumer, F. (eds.), Jazz and Europe (Northeastern University Press, forthcoming).

Kerschbaumer, F., “Jazz Research in Austria”, in: Jazzforschung / Jazz Research, Vol. 42, Graz 2010.

Kerschbaumer, F., “Impressionistische Strukturen im Jazz”, in: Blomann, U.J., and Heßler, H.-J., (eds.), Rastlose Brückenbauerin: Festschrift zum 80. Geburtstag von Ilse Storb, Duisburg 2009.

Kerschbaumer, F., “Tonale Absorptionen in der Entwicklung des Jazz: Von der britischen Folk Music bis Arnold Schönberg”, in: Jazzforschung / Jazz Research, Vol. 38, Graz 2006.

Kerschbaumer, F., “Keltische Wurzeln in der amerikanischen Popularmusik”, in: Musikethnologische Sammelbände, Vol. 20, Aachen 2005. Kerschbaumer, F., “Der Einfluss der iro-schottischen Musik auf die Entstehung des Jazz”, in: Jazzforschung / Jazz Research, Vol. 36, Graz 2004.

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

Professor George McKay

Title: 
Senior Researcher
Institution: 
University of Salford
Address: 
Adelphi House
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
g.a.mckay@salford.ac.uk

I joined the University of Salford in 2005, as Professor of Cultural Studies; before that I held the same position at UCLan. I am Director of the Communication, Cultural & Media Studies Research Centre. My work has been awarded funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC; four awards to date–five if we include HERA), British Council, European Commission (Framework 6), Leverhulme Trust, British Academy, HEFCE, among others. I am a member of the AHRC Peer Review College, for Media, and for Music. I am currently a member of the Media, Communication & Cultural Studies Association (MeCCSA) executive–MeCCSA being the national UK association for scholars and postgraduate students in the field.  I have undertaken external examining responsibilities at around 15 institutions, at PhD, MA and BA levels. I have been a Visiting Fellow at University of Southern Maine, USA (1994), University of Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria (1996), and at University of Sydney, Australia (2008).

In terms of public engagement, I am a fairly frequent contributor to British and some international media, including BBC and independent radio, having appeared on programmes as varied as Thinking Allowed (several times) and The Johnnie Walker Show. I have also appeared on numerous television programmes–news and documentaries–and written for publications such as the Guardian, Independent, Times Higher EducationNew Statesman. A two-part  ABC radio documentary in 2009, on the leading Australian music programme Into the Music,  focused heavily on my research on street music and popular protest. 

Research Interests: 

My areas of expertise for research, teaching, media comment and PhD supervision are:

  • Alternative cultures and media, (post)subcultures, protest and social movements
  • Festival, music and social change
  • Cultures of transatlanticism
  • Disability and cultural studies
  • Media studies
Publications: 

Founding co-editor, Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest (Routledge, 2002-) www.informaworld.com

Editor, DiY Culture: Party & Protest in Nineties Britain (Verso, 1998)

Senseless Acts of Beauty: Cultures of Resistance since the Sixties (Verso, 1996)

co-ed. with Pete Moser, Community Music: A Handbook (Russell House, 2005)

Glastonbury: A Very English Fair (Gollancz, 2000)

Circular Breathing: The Cultural Politics of Jazz in Britain (Duke UP, 2005)

Co-editor, with Neil Campbell and Jude Davies, Issues in Americanisation and Culture (Edinburgh UP, 2004)

Co-editor, BAAS Paperbacks Series (Edinburgh UP 1993-2002).

Radical Gardening: Idealism, Rebellion and Politics in the Garden (Frances Lincoln, 2011)

 

Project Title: 
Rhythm Changes

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