PhotoCLEC

Curating Photographs in the Museum Space.

Event Date: 
Tue, 25/10/2011 - 11:30 to 17:30
Venue: 
PHRC De Montfort University
Location: 
Leicester UK

 A one-day workshop on curating photographs in museums, aimed at museum professionals and students of photographic history. The day will look at questions of curatorship in multicultural and cross-cultural environments, display strategies, and approaches to collections history. 

 

Museums, Photographs and the Colonial Past

Event Date: 
Thu, 12/01/2012 - 14:00 to Fri, 13/01/2012 - 18:30
Venue: 
Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford
Location: 
Oxford

                      

 

               

Museums, Photographs and the Colonial Past

 

This conference examines the politics, poetics and ethics of the photographic visibility of the colonial past in museums in multicultural societies and the construction of postcolonial identities. It will explore the use of photographs in public narratives of difficult histories and examine different sets of problems and approaches across a number of European countries. It raises questions not only about the patterns of engagement, nostalgia, suppression, disavowal and unspeakability which cluster around representations of the colonial past, but questions about the role of photographs in the public space. What is the work expected of photographs? Is the apparent immediacy of the past in photographs too direct and uncontrollable to be accommodated in the carefully managed spaces of state multiculturalism?  What is the role of the artist’s intervention, digital environments, and community projects?  Are there ’safe spaces’ where the colonial might be addressed? Ultimately what kinds of narratives are museums constructing and for whom? How can the complexities of colonial relations be represented in museums and do photographs help or hinder?

 

The conference is part of the European-funded PhotoCLEC project, an international collaboration of scholars from the UK, The Netherlands and Norway. (see: http://www.heranet.info/photoclec/index). The conference will include the launch of the project’s web resource.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Benoît De L’Estoile (CNRS)

Dr Wayne Modest (Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam)

 

Other Confirmed Speakers include:

Professor Susan Legêne (VU University, Amsterdam), Professor Sigrid Lien (University of Bergen), Professor Elizabeth Edwards (DMU), Miranda Pennell (Filmmaker, Goldsmiths College, University of London), Dr Chiara de Cesari (University of Cambridge), Dr  Sabine Cornelis (RCMA) and Dr Johan Lagae (Univeristy of Ghent).

 

Fee: £35                                                  Symposium Dinner: c.£32 t.b.c

Places are limited. Please contact Mandy Stuart (astuart@dmu.ac.uk) to reserve your place.

 

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/aad/photographic-history-research-centre/

 

 

Photographs, Colonial Legacy and Museums

Event Date: 
Tue, 23/11/2010 - 12:00
Venue: 
Studentsenteret
Location: 
University of Bergen

Research Seminar: Dr. Matt Mead "Post-imperial Pathologies: colonial legacies and photography in the museum"

Event Date: 
Wed, 15/06/2011 - 17:30 to 19:30
Venue: 
University of the Arts London (LCC), Elephant and Castle, London
Location: 
Media Block 4th Floor 401A,

Seminar:'Excavating Experience: Photographs and Difficult Histories' (Elizabeth Edwards)

Event Date: 
Thu, 03/02/2011 - 18:00 to 19:30
Venue: 
CRASSH. University of Cambridge
Location: 
Cambridge
External Website Address: 

Photographs, Colonial Legacy and Museums in Contemporary European Culture (PhotoCLEC)

This project asks “what is the role of the photographic legacy of colonial relations in the identity of a fluid and multi-cultural modern Europe and its global relations?”
 Through the prism of photography, PhotoCLEC is concerned with colonialism and the way contemporary European cultures configure their pasts for the benefit of their futures. It is a detailed comparative study of the aims, strategies and efficacy of institutional practices as museums attempt to position colonial photograph collections in ways relevant to contemporary European societies and their futures. Importantly it asks how do differently constituted colonial experiences translate into differently nuanced visual legacies and how do these visual legacies resonate through differently shaped post-colonial experiences? As such it addresses an extensive yet largely neglected body of European cultural history, rooted in and outside Europe, which is actively moving across cultural boundaries, making new meanings in newly configured national and transnational communities in a global environment..
The collaborative nature of the project is central to the formulation of the research question itself, which will be explored through linked ethnographies of museum practices and strategies across the partner countries. It involves linked projects in three European countries with very different colonial experiences to compare and contrast their visual legacies in contemporary societies. UK and The Netherlands were major colonial powers but with different ‘styles’ of colonial engagement and different patterns of de-colonisation and post-colonial engagement at home and abroad. Norway, though not a colonial power in the territorial sense, was engaged with extensive ‘colonial-derived’ activities e.g. exploration, science and missions, and has colonial-style issues over Sami histories, adding an important and expansive dimension to the project. These histories have collectively left extensive visual legacies in the institutions of the three countries, patterned by different institutional approaches in universities, local authorities and government institutions.

PhotoCLEC

Dr Hilde Nielssen

Title: 
Research Officer
Institution: 
LLE, University of Bergen
Address: 
N-5007 Parkvei 20 Bergen Norway
E-mail: 
Hilde.Nielssen@lle.uib.no

 PhotoCLEC Research Officer on the Norwegian project "Foreign and Home Images of Unacknowledged Colonial Legacies", and  Researcher, Institute for Linguistic. Literary and Aesthetic Studies, University of Bergen.  She undertook her PhD studies in Madagascar, working on ritual theory, ritual aesthetics and spirit possession. 

Research Interests: 

Ritual theory, ritual aesthetics, spirit possession in Madagascar, anthropological museology and material culture, missionary ethnography and the Nordic culture of colonialism.

Publications: 

 2011. Ritual Imagination. Tromba possession among the Betsimisaraka of Eastern Madagascar. Studies of Religion in Africa. Brill Publications. (Forthcoming).


2008. Til Jordens ender. Fortellinger om norsk misjon (To the ends of the world. Stories on the Norwegian mission). Editor and Introduction to Bergen: Bergen Museum Publications.


2008.  “Kom over og hjelp oss (Come and help us)”, Nielssen, Hilde & Karina Hestad Skeie, in Til Jordens ender. Fortellinger om norsk misjon. Bergen: Bergen Museum Publications.


2008. ”Jeg tillader mig at sende en gasserbylt" (I permit myself to send a bundle of Malagasy things)” in Til Jordens ender. Fortellinger om norsk misjon. Bergen: Bergen Museum Publications.


2007. ”Til Jordens Ender. Om hvordan verden ble brakt til Norge og omvendt på etnografiske utstillinger i misjonsregi.” (To the ends of the world: How the world was brought to Norway and vice versa through mission exhibitions.Norsk antropologisk tidsskrift (Norwegian Anthropological Review) 18(3-4): 196-216.



2007. “From Norway to the Ends of the World: Missionary Contributions to Norwegian Images of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’.” In Encountering Foreign Worlds – Experiences at Home and Abroad. Reykjavik: University of Iceland Press.   

Project Title: 
PhotoCLEC

Dr. Matthew Mead

Title: 
Research Officer.
Institution: 
De Montfort University, Leicester
Address: 
Photographic History Research Centre, Portland Building, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
mmead@dmu.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44 (0)116 257 7670

 

 Dr Matt Mead is Research Fellow in the Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities and joined DMU in 2011, after one year at the University of the Arts, London. He completed his doctoral thesis in 2010, working on an interdisciplinary approach to reading memory and uses of the past across contemporary literature, museum culture, historiography and critical theory.



 

Dr Mead's research is interdisciplinary in nature and contributes to various aspects of memory studies including uses of the past in contemporary literature, museum culture, collectors and collecting, photography, trauma studies and theorising around modalities of nostalgia. Much of this work is informed by postcolonial theory.

 

He has had articles published in The Journal of Postcolonial Writing and Kunapipi. He is currently developing a research project on the London Missionary Society's publications for children.

 



Research Interests:



Museum culture


Contemporary literature


Postcolonial theory


Photography
Trauma studies


Nostalgia


Collectors and collecting


Multiculturalism


Memory studies


 

Research Interests: 

 Post-colonial literature, British multi-cultural memory practices

Publications: 

 2009. “Empire Windrush: The cultural memory of an imaginary arrival.”

The Journal of Postcolonial Writing 45.2: 137-149.

2007. “Empire Windrush: Cultural memory and archival disturbance.”

Moveable Type 3: 112-28.

<http://www.ucl.ac.uk/english/graduate/issue/3/pdf/ mead.pdf>.

2006. Rev. of Imagining London, by John Clement Ball, Postcolonial

London, by John Mcleod and Black British Literature, by Mark Stein.

Journal of Postcolonial Writing 42.1: 119-21.

2006. “Relay and Translation: An anglophone reads Patrick Chamoiseau’s

Texaco.”  Kunapipi 28.1: 47-58.

2005. Rev. of Guyana and the Caribbean: Reviews, Essays and

Interviews, by Frank Birbalsingh. Journal of Postcolonial Writing 41.1:

125-27.

Project Title: 
PhotoCLEC

Dr. Pamela Pattynama

Title: 
Research Officer
Institution: 
VU University Amsterdam
E-mail: 
P.Pattynama@uva.nl
Telephone: 
+31 (0) 20 6227543

 Pamela Pattynama is Research Officer on PhotoCLEC IP “Indies Images of the Colonial Everyday in a Multi-ethnic Postcolonial Society”. She is seconded from her post of Indisch Huis Professor of Colonial and Postcolonial Literature and Culture History, in which she specialises in the Dutch East Indies. She also teaches film studies and literary studies at the University of Amsterdam. She has published widely on (post)colonial discourse and the representation of gender and mixed race in Dutch (post-)colonial films and literature. Another focal point in her research is the formation of identities and memory in migrant communities. She is currently working on a book on postcolonialism and cultural memory in literature, photography and film.

 

Research Interests: 

 Research Interests: Cultural memory, post-colonial literature, colonial film and the representation of gender and mixed race.

Project Title: 
PhotoCLEC

Professor Elizabeth Edwards

Title: 
Project Leader
Institution: 
De Montfort University, Leicester
Address: 
Photographic History Research Centre, Portland Building, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
eedwards@dmu.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44 (0)116 257 7670

Elizabeth Edwards is an historian by training but has been fully absorbed by anthropology. She works on the relationship between photography, anthropology and history, especially in the Pacific, on cross-cultural visual histories, on photographs as material culture and the history of collecting and institutional practices.  Until 2005 she was Curator of Photographs at Pitt Rivers Museum and lecturer in Visual Anthropology at University of Oxford, and then Senior Research Fellow at the University of the Arts London (LCC) until 2011. She has recently taken up the post of Research Professor and Director of the Photographic History Research Centre at De Montfort University. As well as being project leader for PhotoCLEC she is further developing her work on the multi-sensory nature of the photograph, and working on photography and historical imagination in late nineteenth and early twentieth century England. The monograph will be published by Duke University Press in February 2012. She is currently Vice-President of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland.

 

Research Interests: 

Photographs as material culture, the senses and emotion.

Photography and historical imagination in the UK

Cross-cultural perspectives in photographic practice.

Photographs and visual history

Relationship between photography and museum practice.

The history of photograph collections in anthropology.

The relationship between anthropology, photography and history.

Publications: 

 2009. Photography, Anthropology and History (ed, with C. Morton).Aldershot: Ashgate.

2009. ‘Photography and the material performance of the past’, History 

and Theory, 48 (4):130-150.


2009. 'Evolving Images: Photography, Race and Popular Darwinism’ in D.

Donald & J. Munro (eds)

Endless Forms, Darwin, Natural Sciences and the  

Visual Arts, New Haven/London, Yale University

Press. pp. 166-193. 

2009. ‘Thinking Photography beyond the Visual ?’ in J.Long, A. Noble and

E. Welch (eds) Photography:

Theoretical Snapshots. London: Routledge, pp. 31-48.

2008. ‘Entangled Documents: Visualised Histories’ Susan Meiselas In

History New York: Steidl/ICP. pp.

330-341.

2008. Visual Sense: The Cultural Reader ed. with K.Bhaumik. Oxford: 

Berg.

2008. ‘Straightforward and Ordered: Amateur Photographic Surveys and  

Scientific Aspiration 1885

1914. Photography and Culture 1(2):185-210.

2007.‘Samuel Butler’s Photography: Observation and the Dynamic Past. 

In James Paradis (ed.

Samuel Butler: Victorian Against the Grain.

Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp. 251-286.

2006. Sensible Objects: Colonialism, Material Culture and the Senses. ed.  

with C.Gosden & R Philips.

Oxford: Berg.


2006. ‘Photographs and the Sound of History’ Visual Anthropology Review 

21(1-2):27-46.

2004. Photographs Objects Histories: On the Materiality of Images,  ed.  

with Janice Hart. London:

Routledge.

2001. Raw Histories: Photographs, Anthropology and Museums. Oxford: 

Berg.

 

Project Title: 
PhotoCLEC

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