IDI4MES

8th International Symposium on Bilingualism, Oslo, June 2011

Event Date: 
Wed, 15/06/2011 - 10:00 to Sat, 18/06/2011 - 18:00
Venue: 
The Department of Linguistics and Scandinavian Studies
Location: 
University of Oslo, Norway
Event File: 
 
In June 2011 the IDI4MES research team will present their emergent findings from the project at the 8th International Symposium on Bilingualism, in Oslo, Norway.
 
Investigating discourses of inheritance and identity infourmultilingualEuropeansettings
 
Convenor: Adrian Blackledge
 
The papers in this colloquium report the emergent findings of a sociolinguistic ethnographic project which investigates how multilingualyoung people negotiate inheritance’and identity’infour superdiverse European settings. Young people inDenmark,Sweden,The Netherlands, and Englandmayidentifywitha distantterritory,butalso belongin their present home, andin globalpopular culture. The research reported here investigates how cultural heritage and identity are discursivelyconstructedin andbeyondeducationalsettings,andhow multilingual young people negotiateinheritanceandbelonging.
 
The colloquium is 3 hrs duration, in six 30-minute slots. Papers are of 20 minutes, with 5 minutes for discussion, and 5 minutes for changeover:
 
  1. Ideologies of language and learning Chinese in the Netherlands: The metalinguistics of a polycentric language. Jinling Li and Kasper Juffermans
  2. Literacy and language practices in Swedish schools.Carla Jonsson, Jarmo Lainio and Anu Muhonen
  3. Enregisterment and Normativity in the Amager Project: Heritage Language and School Language. Andreas Stæhr, Astrid Ag, Martha Karrebæk, Lian Malai Madsen, Janus Møller, Jens Normann Jørgensen.
  4. Discourses of inheritance and identity in the Panjabi classroom. Angela Creese, Jaspreet Takhi and Adrian Blackledge
  5. Discussant’s remarks: Sian Preece
  6. Discussion
Jinling Li and Kasper Juffermans report their ongoing ethnographic fieldwork in and around a Chinese heritage school in the Netherlands, and provide examples of how students, teachers and parents value or devalue (certain parts of) Chinese and Chinese language education. 
Carla Jonsson, Jarmo Lainio and Anu Muhonen focus on literacy practices among multilingual adolescents in two schools: one where students speak Finnish and Swedish, and one where students speak Spanish and Swedish. Ethnographic observations demonstrate students’ engagement in language practices to negotiate Finnish- and Spanish-speaking heritage and articulate different identities.
The Amager Project in Copenhagen studies adolescent students in a Danish public school who have very different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Ethnographic observations, interviews, recordings of peer conversations, written essays and Facebook exchanges are used to discuss the students’ reflections on the varieties available to them, including their norms of usage.
Angela Creese, Jaspreet Takhi and Adrian Blackledge investigate how changingPanjabi-heritage communities in the UK foster the generationaltransmission ofcultural heritage through language learning. Detailed ethnographic observation evidences near and distant worlds connected through interactional resources, as Panjabi classrooms become sites for negotiation of inheritance and identity.
 
 
 
 

IDII4MES Project Team Meeting

Event Date: 
Wed, 18/05/2011 - 09:30 to Thu, 19/05/2011 - 17:00
Venue: 
School of Education
Location: 
University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK

This meeting in Birmingham allows the whole multi-site team to convene and discuss the progress of the research and field work, and to share emergent analysis.

Seminar at Birkbeck College, London entitled "Researching Multilingualism in Complementary Schools"

Event Date: 
Thu, 10/03/2011 -
11:00 to 17:30
Venue: 
Department of Applied Linguistics & Communication
Location: 
Birkbeck College, University of London
External Website Address: 
Event File: 

 

 
Outline
Complementary schools are voluntary organisations by minority ethnic or linguistic communities, often of immigration backgrounds, to teach languages and cultures to the local-born generations of children and young people. They have been a major global educational movement since the 1950s – variably known as heritage (language) schools, community (language) schools, or supplementary schools. Yet, public awareness of the complementary schools is low. Recently, a number of research projects have emerged in Britain, where some 3,000 complementary schools exist teaching a very wide range of languages and cultures. These research projects have demonstrated the significant impact of the complementary schools on the communities they are serving as well as the wider society and the diverse practices and ideologies amongst them. They also highlight the need for further research into these schools with particular regards to educational and social policy, community cohesion and identity development of young people. This workshop aims to introduce researchers new to complementary schools to the theoretical and methodological issues in researching this particular site of multilingualism.

 

Professors Angela Creese, Professor Adrian Blackledge and Jaspreet Kaur Takhi will be presenting a paper entitled; "Researching Multilingualism in Complementary Schools: an ethnographic framework", where they will be presenting data collected from the ongoing HERA project looking at discourses of inheritance and identity in Panjabi Complementary Schools in Birmingham.

Investigating Discourses of Inheritance and Identity in Four Multilingual European Settings (IDII4MES)

European Flag

 

Globalization and global mobility are creating multilingual and multi-ethnic societies throughout Europe and beyond. ‘Inheritance’ and ‘identity’ are no longer necessarily tied to the nation-state. Rather, allegiances and cultural traditions travel across national boundaries, as diasporic groups differentially retain affiliation to national heritage, and global communication transcends traditional borders. Many parts of Europe are now characterised by ‘super-diversity’, distinguished by a dynamic interplay of variables among multiple-origin, transnationally connected migrants. Modes of migrant transnationalism, negotiated in everyday interactions, remain seriously understudied. This sociolinguistic ethnographic project investigates how multilingual young people negotiate ‘inheritance’ and ‘identity’ in four European settings. Young people of migrant heritage in Denmark, Sweden, The Netherlands, and England may identify with a distant territory, but also ‘belong’ in their present home, and in global popular culture. In this study a research team across four universities investigates how cultural heritage and identity are discursively constructed in and beyond educational settings, and how multilingual young people negotiate inheritance and belonging. The project extends current understandings of cultural heritage and local, national, and global identities.

There are five aims to the research:
1. To investigate the range of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people in four European settings.
2. To explore the cultural and social significance of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people in four European settings.
3. To investigate how the language and literacy practices of multilingual young people in four European settings are used to negotiate inheritance and identities.
4. To develop innovative multi-site, ethnographic team methodologies using interlocking case studies across national, social, cultural, and linguistic contexts.
5. To contribute to policy and practice in the inclusion of non-national minority languages in the wider European educational agenda.

The consortium comprises teams of expert researchers in Birmingham, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Tilburg. The project brings together academic colleagues who have conducted sociolinguistic ethnographic research with multilingual young people in Europe. Each team member offers distinctive yet complementary skills, knowledge, and experience. In addition the team brings together the interdisciplinary expertise of JinLing Li, Kasper Juffermans and Sjaak Kroon from Babylon Centre for Studies of the Multicultural Society, Tilburg University; Angela Creese, Jaspreet Kaur Takhi from MOSAIC Centre for Research on Multilingualism, University of Birmingham; Lian Malai Madsen and Janus Spindler Møller from the Centre for the Study of Danish as a Second Language and the Centre for the Study of Language Change in Real Time, University of Copenhagen; and Carla Jonsson and Anu Muhonen from Centre for Research on Bilingualism and Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Stockholm University .
 

IDI4MES

Professor Adrian Blackledge

Title: 
Professor of Bilingualism
Institution: 
School of Education, University of Birmingham
Address: 
Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT
Country: 
United Kingdom
E-mail: 
a.j.blackledge@bham.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44(0)1214158221

Adrian Blackledge is Professor of Bilingualism and Director of the MOSAIC Centre for Research on Multilingualism at University of Birmingham. He is author of numerous articles and books based on his research on multilingualism in education and wider society. His books include The Routledge Handbook of Multilingualism (2012); Multilingualism. A Critical Perspective (2010); Discourse and Power in a Multilingual World (2005); Negotiation of Identities in Multilingual Contexts (2004); Multilingualism, Second Language Learning, and Gender (2001); Literacy, Power, and Social Justice (2000); and Teaching Bilingual Children (1994).

Research Interests: 

Adrian Blackledge conducts research in the fields of: multilingualism; linguistic ethnography; education of linguistic minority students; multilingual literacies; language ideologies; discursive negotiation of identities in multilingual contexts; critical discourse analysis; language testing, citizenship, and migration.

Publications: 

 

Blackledge, A. and Creese, A. (2008) Contesting ‘language’ as ‘heritage’: Negotiation of identities in late modernity. Applied Linguistics 29 (4) 533-554.
 
Blackledge, A. and Creese, A. (2009) Meaning-making as dialogic process: Official and carnival lives in the language classroom. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education. 8, 4, 236-253.
 
Blackledge, A. and Creese, A. (2009) ‘Because tumi Bangali’ : Inventing and disinventing the national in multilingual communities in UK. Ethnicities. 9, 4, 451-476
 
Blackledge, A. and Creese, A. (2010). Multilingualism, A Critical Perspective. London, Continuum.
 
Creese, A. and Blackledge A. (2010) Translanguaging in the bilingual classroom: A pedagogy for learning and teaching. Modern Language Journal. 94, 2. 103-115.
Project Title: 
IDI4MES

Professor Jan Blommaert

Title: 
Project Investigator
Institution: 
Tilburg University
Address: 
Tilburg University Room D 208, PO Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands
E-mail: 
j.blommaert@uvt.nl
Telephone: 
+31 13 466 3770

Jan Blommaert has published widely on language ideologies and language inequality in Africa and Europe, with highlights such as The Sociolinguistics of Globalization (Cambridge University Press, 2010), Grassroots Literacy (Routledge, 2008), Discourse: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge University Press 2005), Language Ideological Debates (edited, Mouton de Gruyter 1999), State Ideology and Language in Tanzania (Köppe 1999) and Debating Diversity (with Jef Verschueren, Routledge 1998).

Publications: 

 

 
 
Blommaert,J.2009. Grassroots Literacy:Writing, Identity andVoice in Africa. London: Routledge,208pp, ISBN 8-0-415-42630-5
 
Blommaert,J.2009.Language, asylum and the nationalorder.Current Anthropology50/4.
 
Blommaert,J.2010 on Hymes.Specialissue,Text& Talk 29/3: 239-369
 
Blommaert, J. 2010. The Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
 
Blommaert, J. (2010). Obituary: Dell Hymes (1927-2009). Journal of Sociolinguistics, 14, 682-686. 
 
Blommaert, J. & Dong, J. (2010). Ethnografic fieldwork: A beginner's guide. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. 
 
Blommaert, J. & Dong, J. (2010). Language and movement in space. In N. Coupland (Ed.), Handbook of language and globalisation. Oxford: Blackwell.
Project Title: 
IDI4MES

Professor Jarmo Lainio

Title: 
Project Leader, Sweden site
Institution: 
Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Stockholm University, Sweden
Address: 
Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
E-mail: 
jarmo.lainio@finska.su.se
Telephone: 
+ 46 8 16 2912

Research Interests: 

He mainly conducts research in the fields of: Finnish as a minority language, bilingual education, sociolinguistics,and language policy andlinguistic minorities. Since 2005 hehas been the Swedish member of the Councilof Europe Expert Committee for the supervision of the European Charter of Regional or Minority Languages. He is a recent President of the Swedish Association of AppliedLinguistics (ASLA) and memberof the board of AILA.

Publications: 

  Lainio, Jarmo (ed.,2006). Utbildningsval, sociala karriärer, spräkliga kompetenser och identiteter (U-SOKKI). Pilotstudiefasen.[Educationalchoices,socialcareers, language competences and identities. The pilot study phase.] Rapporter fran Finskt sprak-och kulturcentrum, 6/U-SOKKI-rapporter, 2. Institutionen for humaniora, Mälardalens hogskola.(ca 215pages)

 
Lainio, Jarmo (2006).Lapsista voi tullakaksikielisiä aikuisia/Barn kan bli tväspräkiga vuxna.Neuvoja monikielisille perheille/Rad till flersprakiga familjer. [Children may become bilingualadults. Advice to multilingual families.] Rapporter fran Finskt sprak- och kulturcentrum, 4.Mälardalens hogskola.(70pages.)
 
Lainio, Jarmo (2007).Tvasprakighetoch sprakkontakteriSverige —gammaltfenomen, nya utvecklingar.[Bilingualismandlanguagecontacts in Sweden —Old phenomenon, new developments.] In: Sundgren,Eva (ed.)Sociolingvistik, 258-308.Stockholm: LiberForlag.
 
Lainio, Jarmo (ed.,2007). Spain and its languages -A comparative view on the regional and minority language policies and developments of Spain and Sweden. [With an Introduction by Lainio.] Papers from the Erkänd2 Conference, Eskilstuna29 September 2006.Reports from the Centre for Finnish Studies,7.Departmentof Humanities, Mälardalen University.
 
LainioJ armo (2007). Spain and Sweden in the light of the European Councils Charter on Regional or Minority Languages.In: Lainio,Jarmo (ed.) 2007. Spain and its languages -A comparative view on the regional and minority language policies and developmentsof Spain and Sweden,15-44.Reports from the Centre forFinnishStudies,7.Departmentof Humanities, Mälardalen University.(30pages)

Project Title: 
IDI4MES

Professor Jens Normann Jørgensen

Title: 
Principal Investigator, Denmark site
Institution: 
University of Copenhagen
Address: 
The Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics (INSS), Njalsgade ,120 DK-2300, Copenhagen, Denmark
Country: 
Denmark
E-mail: 
normann@hum.ku.dk
Telephone: 
+ 45 35 32 83 64
Research Interests: 

Normann Jørgensen’s primary research interest is in sociolinguistics. Themes within this field include variationin spoken Danish,including classical dialects, urban language, and youth language; multilingualism,particularly the language behaviours of linguistic minority children and adolescents in Denmark, mainly Turkish-speakers; and language and education. He has published an extensive range of books and scholarly articles in these fields.

Publications: 

 

2008     (ed, withV.Lytra):Multilingualism and Identities Across Contexts. Cross- disciplinary perspectives on Turkish-speaking youth in Europe. Copenhagen Studies in Bilingualism vol. 45. University of Copenhagen Faculty of Humanities.
Including: - Multilingualism and Identities Across Contexts. Cross-disciplinary perspectives on Turkish-speaking youth in Europe, 5-14 (with V.Lytra).-Poly-Lingual Languaging. Evidence from Turkish-Speaking Youth, 129-150.
 
2008       Poly-Lingual Languaging Around and Among Children and Adolescents. In:International Journal of Multilingualism Vol.5:3,161-176.
 
2008     Urban wall languaging.In: International Journal of Multilingualism Vol.5:3,237-252).
 
2009     Poly-Lingual Languagingin Peer GroupInteraction.In:Nordisk tidsskrift for andrespräksforskningVol. 3:2, 39-56(withJ.S.Møller)
 
2009     Languaging.Nine years of poly-lingual developmentof young Turkish-Danish grade schoolstudents. Copenhagen: Danish Universityof Education.
 
2009     From Language to Languaging: Changing relations between humans and linguistic features.In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia,vol.41.Routledge (with J.S.Møller)
 
Project Title: 
IDI4MES

Birmingham team presents its report to Panjabi school

                       On 19th May 2012 we presented our report to the research participants from the Panjabi school,
                       including administrators, trustees, teachers, students, parents and other stakeholders. The
                      report was well received, and the school was keen to maintain the relationship begun through
                      the IDII4MES project. In December 2012 CEDF Panjabi School had a sustained collaboration
                      with CEDF Panjabi School.           

 

Complementary schools: hidden assets of a multilingual Birmingham

Research led by Angela Creese, Professor of Educational Linguistics at University of Birmingham, has highlighted the value of complementary schools within and beyond the communities they serve. Complementary schools run alongside mainstream provision and are often staffed on a voluntary basis. They provide a space for young people from linguistic minorities to study their home and community language, religion, and heritage. For more information view the vodcast via the link: http://www.birmingham.bham.ac.uk/projects/complementary-schools.shtml

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