HERAVALUE

HERAVALUE project meeting: measures to capture the value of arts and humanities research

Event Date: 
Sat, 19/03/2011 - 18:00 to Mon, 21/03/2011 - 18:00
Venue: 
Ramada Hotel Berlin-Alexanderplatz
Location: 
Berlin, Germany

Measuring the public value of arts and humanities research From theoretical challenges and practical problems towards a policy, public and university consensus

Event Date: 
Thu, 25/10/2012 - 13:00 to Fri, 26/10/2012 - 14:00
Venue: 
Dublin Institute of Technology
Location: 
Dublin, Ireland

 The HERAVALUE final conference will be held on 25th-26th October 2012 at the Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland.

"Measuring the public value of arts and humanities research From theoretical challenges and practical problems towards a policy, public and university consensus"



 

There has been huge pressure in the last decade on sciences across the developed world to demonstrate their value, not only to the scientific communities who use that research, but also to society more generally.  As part of attempts to stimulate science to be more ‘useful’, there has been considerable emphasis placed on identifying what the public value of research is, and developing measures, metrics and instruments to reward those who are able to deliver that value.

But at the same time, there has been a persistent feeling amongst all of those with a wider interest in science – from academics and universities, through governments and funders, to cultural bodies and the public at large – that those measures and processes identified fail to really capture ‘what matters’ to the public about research.    In particular the humanities face the problem that the value measures they produce are often contested and disputed.  This is a real problem for the humanities: by failing to demonstrate their value, despite its obvious utility across a range of domains, humanities faces losing its funding share to those disciplines able to make (arguably highly contentious) evidence-based claims for the wider social developments that their research drives. 

Humanities’ communities have responded to this challenge actively, as part of ensuring the sustainability and survival of research in the sector.  The idea of e-Humanities and Digital Humanities have become visible in many European countries as one emergent solution to this problem, attempting to create a variety of humanities that looks like hard science in terms of using extensive infrastructures, and hence which can justify its own wider societal usefulness. Many countries across Europe have devoted considerable effort to trying to develop better methods for identifying and measuring social impact in the humanities.

However, all this effort had happened without ever really being able to precisely define the question of what is good about ‘public value’, in the way that there is a consensus about what is ‘good’ about science value.  There are a large number of (primarily emergent) solutions to the problems emerging in measuring that value.

This Conference takes a different starting point: beginning from what matters as a basis for what needs to be measured.  Building on the findings from a thirty-month European research project, the conference aims to provide an intellectual space to discuss, debate and most importantly, attempt to answer three key questions:‑

(1)        How can ‘good’ public value be better defined as a concept,

(2)        Who are the various publics for research in the humanities, and what do they value about humanities research? And

(3)        How can research policy better reflect different user needs and demands for arts and humanities research?

This event discusses these questions in an international comparative context, to create a deeper understanding of the practical approaches that have been adopted in a range of countries, to identify a set of boundary conditions for ‘excellent’ impact by humanities research.  Drawing on an international comparative project entitled Measuring the Public Value of Arts and Humanities Research (HERAVALUE) the event seeks to start to provide some answers to these questions that are as useful to government as to university and scholarly communities.

The format for the event includes a mix of keynote presentations, presentation and discussions of findings from the project, responses and contributions from participants in the HERA Joint Research Programme, and a concluding policy roundtable.  This event will be of interest to policy-makers, researchers, university leaders and the users of humanities research.

The conference is free and registration can be requested by mailing Martin Ryan

The project HERAVALUE is financially supported by the HERA Joint Research Programme which is co-funded by AHRC, AKA, DASTI, ETF, FNR, FWF, HAZU, IRCHSS, MHEST, NWO, RANNIS, RCN, VR and The European Community FP7 2007-2013, under the Socio-economic Sciences and Humanities programme.

 

Measuring the Societal Impacts of Universities’ Research into Arts and the Humanities (HERAVALUE)

HERAVALUE considers the persistent failure amongst government, universities, learned societies and societal stakeholders to develop performance measures which can quantify or capture the impacts that arts and humani- ties research (A&HR) has upon society. HERAVALUE argues that this failure to achieve an explicit agreement – which is very damaging to arts and humanities disci- plines – is underlain by a dissonance in the implicit ways in which these groups regard the value of arts & humani- ties. HERAVALUE therefore begins from these implicit valuations to explore ‘what matters’ to different groups about arts & humanities research, and from that to ex- plore whether there is common ground around which a consensus of this value lies. The research project builds a conceptual framework for A&HR valorization, tests this framework with empirical evidence, and explores the util- ity of methodological approaches for better capturing ‘what matters’ to arts and humanities research..

The consortium brings together experts in the fields of knowledge exchange, university performance manage- ment and institutional management to ask the question “what matters about arts & humanities research”. Three individual projects start by asking how do universities, policy-makers and societal stakeholders value A&HR, and then turn to consider how those values can be expressed through knowledge exchange projects, through perform- ance measures and indicators, and university knowledge transfer infrastructure. Although starting from three sepa- rate points, through the significant overlaps in the theme areas, and with considerable time in the effort devoted to inter-project exchange, these three IPs build into a wider scientific conversation that speaks to critical theoretical and policy questions concerning maximizing the tangible impacts that A&HR is able to deliver.     

 

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HERAVALUE

Dr. Ellen Hazelkorn

Institution: 
Dublin Institute of Technology
Address: 
Dublin, Ireland
E-mail: 
Ellen.Hazelkorn@dit.ie
Project Title: 
HERAVALUE

Dr. Magnus Gulbrandsen

Institution: 
NIFU STEP
Address: 
Norway
E-mail: 
magnus.gulbrandsen@nifustep.no
Taxonomy upgrade extras: 
Project Title: 
HERAVALUE

Dr. Paul Benneworth

Title: 
Principal Researcher
Institution: 
Center for Higher Education Policy Studies (CHEPS)
Address: 
University of Twente
E-mail: 
p.benneworth@utwente.nl
Telephone: 
+31 53 489 3271

Paul Benneworth graduated in Human Geography from OxfordUniversity in 1995 with a double first, specialising in economic and urban geography.  That same year, he started working as a Research Assistant for Northumbria Police, in the UK and registered for a part-time Ph.D. at the Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies at the University of Newcastle.  In early 1996, he moved from the police to work at CURDS as a junior research associate, and remained there for thirteen years, completing his Ph.D., achieving a permanent position (‘tenure’) and university lectureship in the school of architecture, planning and landscape.  His research in this period focused on the role of entrepreneurship, innovation and technological change in regional economic development, in particular the influence of universities in less successful regions, the subject of his Ph.D. thesis (completed 2002).   In August 2009, he moved to the Center for Higher Education Policy Studies at the University of Twente, in the Netherlands, as a Senior Research Associate, to extent his interests in the relationships between universities and society.

 

He has undertaken a wide number of research projects for a range of clients.  He has successfully won research council funding from the UK Economic and Social Research Councils (post-doctoral fellowship, small research grant, standard research grant within the Regional Impact of HEIs programme) and Research Councils UK (Academic Fellowship), as well as from the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) programme, administered by the European Science Foundation.  He has had two research grants from the UK’s National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts, and has undertaken research and consultancy services for a range of UK bodies, including the Small Business Service, the Department for Farming and Rural Affairs, the Department of the Environment, Transport & Regions, as well as for a range of subnational bodies including regional assemblies, regional university associations and regional assemblies.  He has worked on several occasions with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, including on their Technology and Innovation Programme Cluster Working Group (2000-01), for Education Division on the Regional Impacts of HEIs programme and for Territorial Development and Governance on Regional Innovation Reviews (Piedmonte, North of England) and their Regional Innovation Strategy project.  He has also undertaken a number of small consultancy projects for a diverse range of organisations including the European Centre for the Strategic Management of Universities, the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement, and the Science for All working group.

Research Interests: 

  

Paul’s major research interest is in the relationship between universities and societal change, from the broad level of how universities as institutions respond to major social shifts such as the emergence of the post-industrial society, to relationships between universities and businesses in the creation of new high-technology businesses and spin-off companies.  He has participated in a wide range of research projects in this area, using a range of quantitative and qualitative indicators.  He has published widely in a range of academic journals in geography, business studies, planning and higher education management, as well as editing a number of books.  His 2007 paper in Progress in Planning “Universities as planning animateurs” was nominated for best published paper in planning at the AESOP conference.  From 2004 to 2008 he was editor of Regions, the magazine of the Regional Studies Association, and from 2010, he is Founder Editor and Editor in Chief of Regional Insights, a new publication launched by the Regional Studies Association.  He has also presented at a wide range of conferences, symposia, workshops and user forums including a number of key note presentations at leasing scientific events. 

Publications: 

 Benneworth, P. S., Charles, D. R. & Madnipour, A. (2010) “Universities as agents of urban change in the global knowledge economy” European Planning Studies  (forthcoming).

Benneworth, P. & Jongbloed, B.W.A (2009) “Who matters to universities? A stakeholder perspective on humanities, arts and social sciences valorisationHigher Education DOI 10.1007/s10734-009-9265-2

Benneworth, P. & Sanderson, A. (2009) “Building institutional capacity for HEI regional engagement in a sparse innovation environment: a case study of Knowledge House” Higher Education Management and Policy, March 2009.

Benneworth, P. S., Coenen, L., Moodyson, J. & Asheim, B. (2009) “Exploring the multiple roles of LundUniversity in strengthening the scania regional innovation system: towards institutional learning? European Planning Studies , 1645 - 1664

Benneworth P, Hospers G-J, (2007) "The new economic geography of old industrial regions: universities as global–local pipelines" Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy 25(6) 779–802

Project Title: 
HERAVALUE
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