Fashioning the Early Modern

2nd "Fashioning the Early Modern" Workshop: Social Groups and Circulation of Fashion, 9-10 March 2011, Helsinki, Finland

Event Date: 
Wed, 09/03/2011 - 10:30 to Thu, 10/03/2011 - 18:00
Venue: 
HCAS, University of Helsinki
Location: 
Helsinki, Finland

The 'Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800' project will be holding its second workshop on 9-10 March 2011, University of Helsinki, Finland. Workshop organiser: Dr Paula Hohti, University of Helsinki (Principal Investigator 4).

The workshop will be organised around the project theme "Social groups and the circulation of fashion". A small number of bursaries will be offered to Early Career participants; they will be able to join in the workshop, present their work and receive feedback from the other attendees.  

Further details about the workshop and bursary applications will be announced on the project website at: http://www.fashioningtheearlymodern.ac.uk/workshops/workshop-2/

3rd Fashioning the Early Modern workshop: Early Textile Production

Event Date: 
Thu, 06/10/2011 - 09:30 to Fri, 07/10/2011 - 18:00
Venue: 
Centre for Textile Research / Old Town Museum
Location: 
Copenhagen & Aarhus, Denmark

The 3rd Fashioning the Early Modern workshop”Early Modern Textile Production” will take place on 6-7 October 2011 in Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark.

The workshop is organised by our project partners from the National Museum of Denmark and the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre for Textile Research, University of Copenhagen. The two-day programme will run in Copenhagen (6 October) and Aarhus (7 October).

On the first day, participants will visit the Brede Manor (18th century mansion from the time of the Danish industrial revolution) and they will also be able to see the collections of textiles from the storerooms of the Danish National Museum’s Conservation Department. The second day will consist of a visit to the Old Town Museum in Aarhus, followed by an afternoon PhD presentations session.

The workshop will be preceded by the CIETA (Centre International des Etudes des Textiles Anciens) conference, Copenhagen, 3-5 October.

 

4th Fashioning the Early Modern workshop: Print Culture and Fashion Products

Event Date: 
Wed, 30/11/2011 - 10:00 to Thu, 01/12/2011 - 18:00
Venue: 
Livrustkammaren (Royal Armoury)
Location: 
Stokcholm, Sweden

Organised by: Peter McNeil (University of Technology Sydney and Stockholm University) and Patrik Steorn (Stockholm University)

Print itself is both a materiality as well as a vehicle of representation. How did the meaning of various forms of fashion-related prints change as they were circulated in new contexts? What is the relationship of ‘fashion words’ and images? What are the mechanisms through which print – as news, trade-cards, respectful and satirical images – supported or undermined the spread of fashions, from head-piece to borders? This workshop aims to track the transmission of ideas about fashion in print as well as in practice – and their inter-relationship for the new readers of the eighteenth century.

On the first day of the workshop participants will be able to gain access to collections from a number of museums (the Nordic Museum, the National Museum of Fine Arts and the Royal Armory / Livrustkammaren). The second day of the workshop will focus on presentations and will give the opportunity to postgraduate students and young professionals to present their work and participate in the discussions.

A number of postgraduate student / early career bursaries will be offered for the attendance of the workshop (details to be announced in due course).

The workshop will be followed by an international symposium “Fashion in Translation”, 2 December 2011. The symposium is hosted by the Centre for Fashion Studies, Stockholm University and is convened by Professor Peter McNeil and Dr Louise Wallenberg. The symposium is open to all; workshop participants are invited to attend.

Fashioning the Early Modern designers' workshop

Event Date: 
Wed, 13/06/2012 - 10:00 to Thu, 14/06/2012 - 15:00
Venue: 
Carlsberg Academy
Location: 
Copenhagen

The HERA funded ‘Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800′ project will be holding a designers’ workshop on 13 June – 14 June, Copenhagen at the Carlsberg Academy. The workshop is organised by Maj Ringgaard (National Museum of Denmark) and Kirsten Toftegaard (Designmuseum Danmark).

On the first day of the workshop organised around the theme of rococo, participants will be able to meet three contemporary Danish designers (Nikoline Liv Andersen, Laura Baruël, Anne Damgaard) who will present and discuss their work in three small discussion groups. The discussions with the designers will be followed by a visit to the Danish Design Museum amd a guided tour by Kirsten Toftegaard.

The second day of the workshop will be a half-day only and will be organised around the theme of knitting. Maj Ringgaard will first present her postdoctoral project on knitting, followed by discussions in two small groups with two knitting designers. The second day of the workshop will finish with lunch.

We welcome participation from scholars with an interest in early modern clothing and / or contemporary design.

The attendance of the workshop is by invitation only.

Fashioning the Early Modern final conference 2012

Event Date: 
Fri, 14/09/2012 - 10:00 to Sat, 15/09/2012 - 18:00
Venue: 
Victoria and Albert Museum
Location: 
London

Introduction

Why did men from Spain to Sweden start to shave their heads and wear someone else’s hair in the mid-seventeenth century? Why did women decide that it was necessary to wear masks and other full-face coverings in public towards the end of the century? What was the economic and social impact of the sudden proliferation of ribbon-making machines?

The “Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Europe 1500-1800” project takes fashion seriously, asking the simple question: how and why did certain goods such as wigs, new textiles, ribbons, ruffs and lace become successful in early mod¬ern Europe while others failed? How far did these goods travel and how were they transmitted across linguistic, social and ge¬ographic borders? These are questions that remain relevant and our project demonstrates how a study of creativity and innovation as an economic and cultural force in the past can help our understanding of the same issues today.

The two-day “Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in 1500-1800 Europe” conference will take place at the Victoria and Albert Museum. It will be organised around three themes: Innovation, Dissemination and Reputation. The following key profile speakers have been invited: Lesley Miller (Victoria and Albert Museum) , John Styles (University of Hertfordshire), Evelyn Welch (University of Queen Mary, University of London).

Programme

For the latest conference programme  see file at the top of this page.

Registration

The registration fee is per day and includes refreshments and conference materials.

Full registration fee: £25.00
Concessionary registration fee: £20
Student registration fee: £10

To register for the conference, go to the V & A website below:
http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/1818/fashioning-the-early-modern-creativity-and-innovation-in-europe-2990/


Contact

For programme and general information about the conference, contact j.bolfek-radovani@qmul.ac.uk.

Fashioning the Early Modern: Innovation and Creativity in Europe, 1500-1800 (Fashioning the Early Modern)

Why did men from Spain to Sweden start to shave their heads and wear someone else’s hair in the mid-seventeenth century? Why did women decide that it was necessary to wear masks and other full-face coverings in public towards the end of the century? What was the economic and social impact of the sudden proliferation of ribbon-making machines?

Funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA), this project takes fashion seriously, asking the simple question: how and why did certain goods such as wigs, new textiles, ribbons, ruffs and lace become successful in early mod­ern Europe while others failed? How far did these goods travel and how were they transmitted across linguistic, social and ge­ographic borders? These are questions that remain relevant and our project demonstrates how a study of creativity and innovation as an economic and cultural force in the past can help our understanding of the same issues today. In doing so, we will create a new interdisciplinary European community of academics, museum curators and fashion and design professionals. We will work together to consider creativity, innovation and fashion in all its aspects from 1500-1800, its display in museum settings and its relevance to contemporary policy, legal practices and to the designers and manufacturers of today’s fashionable goods.

Over the next three years we will hold workshops and conferences, provide information that will feed into exhibitions and museum displays, produce web-trails and web-discussions as well as producing a series of books, essays and articles. Divided into five themes, we will be exploring fashion networks, new technologies, patents and protec­tion; the designer and the merchant: names, reputations and the language of innovation; print-culture and fashion products; social groups and the circulation of fashion; and creative traditions: knitting in Europe, 1500-1800.

We will be working closely with museums with internationally renowned collections of fash­ion and textiles including the Victoria and Albert Musem, UK, the Danish Museum of Art and Design, the Danish National Museum and the Danish Open Air Museum and the Nordiska museet and the Royal Armouries, Stockholm.

Fashioning the Early Modern

Dr. Lesley Miller

Title: 
Senior Curator (Textiles), Department of Furniture, Textiles and Fashion
Institution: 
Victoria and Albert Museum
Address: 
Department of Furniture, Textiles and Fashion, V&A, South Kensington, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL
E-mail: 
le.miller@vam.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44 (0)20 7942 2682

Lesley Miller is Senior Curator (Textiles), Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V & A), London. She studied at the University of Glasgow and the Courtauld Institute of Art before moving to Brighton Polytechnic, where she was awarded her PhD for a thesis entitled ‘Designers in the Lyons Silk Industry, 1712-1787’ in 1988. She taught History of Design for over 20 years. Her most significant publications have focused on aspects of design and commerce in the eighteenth-century French silk industry, and she has written a monograph on the Spanish fashion designer, Cristóbal Balenciaga.
Research Interests: 

Tradition and innovation in the European fashion and textiles trades of the 17th and 18th centuries; the role of the designer and merchant in creating and selling silks, with particular reference to 18th-century France and Spain; continuity and change in post-war haute couture.
Publications: 

- „Philippe de Lasalle et les innovations‟ in Les objets qui racontent l’histoire. Inventions et innovations dans la soierie lyonnaise, Lyon : Musée des Tissus, 2009, Chapitre 5, pp. 57-65.

- „Les matériaux du costume de cour‟ in Fastes de Cour et cérémonies royales. Le Costume de Cour en Europe 1650 - 1800, exh. cat., ed. Pierre Arrizoli, Château de Versailles, 2009, pp. 78-89.

- „Departing from the Pheasant and the Peacock: the Role of Furnishing Textiles in the Career of Philippe Lasalle (1723-1804)‟, in Furnishing Textiles, Riggisberger Berichte, Abegg Stiftung, Riggisberg, 2009, pp. 79-90.

- Balenciaga. The Couturiers’ Couturier, London : V&A Publishing, 2007 (translated into Spanish as Balenciaga: Modisto de modistos, Barcelona: Gustavo Gili, 2007), 128 pp.

- „Textile Manufacturers and Haute Couture‟, in The Golden Age of Haute Couture: Paris and London, 1947-57, London: V&A Publishing, 2007, pp. 113-36; „Balenciaga. Master Tailor‟, pp. 154-55.

 - „Dress to Impress. Prince Charles Plays Madrid, September to May 1623‟ in The Journey of the Prince of Wales to Madrid in 1623, ed. Alexander Samson , Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2006, Chapter 2, pp. 27-50.

- „Extra muros/intra muros: Universities, Museums and Textile History‟, and „Sources for the Study of Dress History, 1750-1900‟, in Tecidos e sua conservação no Brasil: museus e coleções (Textile Conservation in Brazil: museums and  collections),conference preprints, São Paulo: USP, 2006, pp. 24-31, 127-130. Printed in English and Portuguese.

- „The Marriage of Art and Commerce: Philippe Lasalle‟s Success in Silks‟, Between Luxury and the Everyday: The Decorative Arts in Eighteenth Century France, eds. Katie Scott and Deborah Cherry, Oxford: Blackwell, 2006, pp. 63-88 (first published as „The Marriage of Art and Commerce: Philippe Lasalle‟s Success in Silks‟, Art History, Vol.28:2, Spring 2005, pp. 200-26).

- „Les matériaux du costume de cour‟ in Fastes de Cour et cérémonies royales. Le Costume de Cour en Europe 1650 - 1800, exh. cat., ed. Pierre Arrizoli, Château de Versailles, 2009, pp. 78-89.

Project Title: 
Fashioning the Early Modern

Dr. Maj G. Ringgaard

Institution: 
National Museum of Denmark
Address: 
Nationalmuseet, Bevaringsafdelingen, Frederiksholms Kanal 12, 1220 København K, Denmark
E-mail: 
maj.ringgaard@natmus.dk
Telephone: 
+45 3347 3541
External Website Address: 

Maj G. Ringgard is an early career scholar working on 17th and 18th century Danish archaeological textiles. She is Conservator MSc. from the School of Conservation at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Art, specialized in textile conservation and has more than twenty years experience from museums mainly focused on various kinds of textile conservation.

Research Interests: 

Cleaning and stabilization methods of archaeological as well as historical textiles, textile Dyes and fibers, textile technologies, knitting, historical cutting and sewing techniques.

 

Publications: 

- Ringgaard, M. (1994): “Textiles”. In H. Brinch Madsen “Handbook of Field Conservation” Copenhagen 1994, s. 115 – 119

- Ringgaard, M. (1995 a): “Bleaching by reduction”. So Many Countries, so Many Customs. Different Approaches to Textile Conservation. Interim Meeting - Conference of the ICOM-CC working Group of Textiles. Budapest, Sept. 1995, p. 29.
- Ringgaard , M. & Skals, I. (1997): “Brown Rags”. WWW. Natmus. Dk
- Ringgaard, M. (2000): The Use of Vacuum Suction Table in Textile Conservation. In eds. R. Hordal & T. Ruben: The Conservator as an Investigator. Tallinn p. 98 - 101
- Ringgaard, M. (2002): An Investigation of the Effects of Borohydride treatments of Oxidzed Cellulose Textiles. In: Strengthening the Bond: Science and Textiles, North American Textile Conservation Conference 2002, p.91 – 101
- Ringgaard, M. (2003): ”Opbevaring og vedligeholdelse af kirkens tekstiler”. In: H. Frøsig Dalgård ”Præsteklæder”, København 2003 p. 94 - 108
- Ringgaard, M. (2005): ”Musselmalede broderier” I Nyt fra NationalMuseet nr. 109.
- Editor: Ringgaard, Maj; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten; Botfeldt, Simon (2005): The form and function of storage buildings / Magasinbygningens fysik og funktion: Museumshøjskolen, Sorø, Danmark, 18-22 oktober , 2004: postprint. NKF-dk, Hvidovre, Danmark. 110 p.
- Ringgaard, M. (2005): Tekstiler reb og snor. In eds. J. Kock og E. Roesdahl ”Boringholm – en østjysk træborg fra 13-årene” Århus universitetsforlag. p. 321-329
- Ringgaard, M. og E. Østergård (2007): “A heap of forgotten textiles from the 14th century Danish fortress, Boringholm In eds. A. Rast-Eicher, R. Windler. “ Archäologische Textilfunde ” Postprint NESAT IX Braunwald. p. 175-177
- Ringgaard, M. (2007): A purple knitted silk among brown rags. Excavated textiles from an 18th century rubbish dump in Copenhagen. In ed.K. Johansen, Costume - design and decoration. Proceedings from the 58th Annual Conference 9-13th October, 2006, Copenhagen, Denmark and Lund, Sweden
- Ringgaard, M. (2008): Cut Stitch and Fabrics: Female Dress in the Past 200 Years. In eds. M. Gleba, C. Munkholt and M. Nosch, ”Dressing the Past”, Ancient Textiles Series vol. 3, 134 – 158, Oxford, Oxbow Books.
- Ringgaard, M. & A, B. Scharff (2010): The Impact of Dyes and Natural Pigmentation of Wool on the Preservation of Archaeological Textiles, in E. Andersson Strand, M. Gleba, U. Mannering, C. Munkholt, M. Ringgaard (eds.), North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles X,  221-224, Oxford, Oxbow Books
Eva Andersson Strand, Margarita Gleba, Ulla Mannering, Cherine Munkholt, Maj Ringgaard (eds), North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles X, Ancient Textiles Series 5, Oxbow Books, Oxford (2010)
 
 
 
Project Title: 
Fashioning the Early Modern

Dr. Paula Hohti

Title: 
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Institution: 
Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Address: 
Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, P.O. Box 4, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki, Finland
E-mail: 
paula.hohti@helsinki.fi
Alternative E-mail: 
Telephone: 
+358-(0)9-191 23500

Paula Hohti has extensive experience in material culture studies and is currently working on the dress of artisan workers in both Italy and Scandinavia. Her research project “The Dress of an Artisan: Clothing, Identity and Fashion in Early Modern Europe” explores what kinds of fashion innovations were circulated among the lower middling classes of artisans, shopkeepers and traders such as barbers, bakers and tailors in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. Drawing on a range of archival documents such as household inventories, account books, notarial contracts and criminal records, it investigates how the design and quality of garments changed across time and space, what mechanisms were used to transmit ideas about fashion, and what meanings families of a lower social rank associated with dress, appearance, and dressing, especially during public occasions such as weddings.

Research Interests: 
  • Early Modern European dress
  • Renaissance material culture
  • Consumer and labour history
  • History of art and design
Publications: 

- The Italian Renaissance of Artisans and Shopkeepers: Culture and Experience in Sixteenth-Century Siena (forthcoming 2012).

 - Hohti, P. (ed.), Beyond Boundaries: One hundred Years of Finnish Design (Avain, forthcoming 2011)
 - Hohti, P., Locating Artisan Communitites: Domestic Space and Identity in sixteenth-Century Siena, Special issue of Urban Studies, edited by Fabrizio Nevola and Guido Rebecchini (forthcoming 2010).
 - Hohti, P., Conspicuous Consumption and Social Status in Sixteenth-Century Italy, Renaissance Studies, vol. 24, no. 5, 2010, 654-670.
 - Hohti, P., Artisans, Pawn-broking and the Circulation of Material Goods in Sixteenth-Century Siena, in M. Ascheri, G. Mazzini, F. Nevola (eds.), Siena nel Rinascimento: L'ultimo secolo della Repubblica, II: Arte, architettura, cultura. Acts of the Conference held in Siena 28-30 September 2003 and 16-18 September 2004 (Siena, 2009), 271-81.
- Hohti, P., The Innkeeper's Goods: The Use and Acquisition of Household Property in Sixteenth-Century Siena, in M. O'Malley and E. Welch (eds.), The Material Renaissance, 1450-1600 (Manchester University Press, 2007), 242-259.
- Hohti, P., Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy: Identities, Families and Masculinities by Sandra Cavallo, Gender and History, vol. 21, no. 1, 2009, 202-3. (book review)
- Hohti, P., Renaissance Siena: Art for a City, Renaissance Studies, Vol 22, issue 5, 2008, 729-734. (exhibition review)
Project Title: 
Fashioning the Early Modern

Professor Evelyn Welch

Title: 
Professor of Renaissance Studies
Institution: 
Queen Mary, University of London
Address: 
School of English and Drama, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS
E-mail: 
e.welch@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: 
+44(0) 20 7882 5006

Evelyn Welch is an art historian with a special interest in European visual and material culture between 1300 and 1700. She is the author of Art and Authority in Renaissance Milan (Yale, 1995), Art in Renaissance Italy, 1350-1500 (OUP, 2000) and Shopping in the Renaissance: Consumer Cultures in Italy 1400-1600 (Yale, 2005) which was jointly awarded the Wolfson Prize for History in 2006. She is co-editor of The Material Renaissance (Manchester University Press, 2007) the result of a three-year Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and Getty Foundation funded project on Italian Renaissance consumption. She has a forthcoming monograph, Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence (with Dr James Shaw) which will be published by Rodopi Press. Her current work focuses on early modern dress and material culture and she has recently completed an AHRC-funded network exploring early modern dress and textiles: www.earlymoderndressandtextiles.ac.uk. Professor Welch is currently serving as Vice-Principal, Research and International Affairs at Queen Mary, University of London.
Research Interests: 
  • Italian Renaissance art and culture
  • Renaissance and Early Modern dress
  • Early Modern material culture
Publications: 

- with James Shaw, Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence: the Speziale al Giglio, Clio Medica series, Rodopi, Amsterdam, forthcoming, 2011.

 - „Art on the Edge: Hair and Hands in Renaissance Italy‟, Renaissance Studies, 2009

 - „ Women in Debt: Financing Female Authority in Renaissance Italy‟, in Donne di potere nel Rinascimento, eds, Letizia Arcangeli and Susanna Peyronel, Viella s.r.l., Rome, 2008, 45-66.

 - „Lotteries in Early Modern Italy‟, Past and Present, 199, 2008, pp.71-111.

 - „Signs of Faith: The Political and Social Identity of Hair in Renaissance Italy‟, in La fiducia secondo i linguaggi del potere. ed. Paolo Prodi, il Mulino, Bologna, 2008, pp. 371-86.

 - with Rosa Tamborrino, eds, Shopping and Housing: Shops, Merchants’ Houses and the Market-place in Europe in the Early Modern Age (Special issue of Città e storia, 2007)

 - Shopping in the Renaissance. Consumer Cultures in Italy, 1350-1600, Yale University Press, 2005 (paperback edition, 2009).

 - with Michelle O‟Malley, eds, The Material Renaissance, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2007.

 

 

 

Project Title: 
Fashioning the Early Modern

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